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  • Go Jane Give organized the “#Read4Refugees” social media campaign, encouraging users to raise awareness and funds for refugee issues. Over the past month, numerous well-known authors have joined in, including Junot DíazJodi Picoult, Sue Monk Kidd, and Sherman Alexie, among others.


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    ~Nick Moran
  • Out this week: The Twelve Lives of Samuel Hawley by Hannah TintiCompass by Mathias EnardThe Women in the Castle by Jessica ShattuckSimulacra by Airea D. Matthews; and the Later Essays of Susan Sontag. For more on these and other new titles, go read our most recent book preview.


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    ~Thomas Beckwith
  • “In a concession to our unsubtle political age, the cliff is doing a good impression of Abraham Lincoln in profile with a vicious orange fulmination exploding from his head.” Looks like Wells Tower had an interesting time in Hawaii.


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    ~Thomas Beckwith
  • “He was surely the greatest literary editor there has ever been – brilliant, autocratic, endlessly curious and possessed of an extraordinary fund of knowledge about a vast range of subjects. True, he was not always easy to deal with, but when has the best ever been easy?” John Banville on the late Robert Silvers.


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    ~Thomas Beckwith
  • If you (for some reason) want to know more about Vladimir Putin, you could do worse than reading Masha Gessen’s biography. At The RumpusKevin Thomas reviews the book in a novel medium: a cartoon. (You could also read our interview with Gessen.)


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    ~Thomas Beckwith
  • Women writers of color can apply for the two-week Writer’s Colony at Dairy Hollow, which is being organized by Jack Jones Literary Arts, and will take place between October 16-30, 2017. The retreat will feature daily master classes with agents, editors, and publishing professionals, and comes with a $1,050 stipend. Applications are open until May 1, 2017.


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    ~Nick Moran
  • The 2017 Whiting Award winners were announced tonight at a ceremony in Manhattan, and this year’s list of ten honorees includes Francisco Cantú (The Line Becomes a River), Simone Wright (Of Being Dispersed), Phillip B. Williams (Thief in the Interior), Kaitlyn Greenidge (We Love You, Charlie Freeman), Tony Tulathimutte (Private Citizens), Jen Beagin (Pretend I’m Dead), and Lisa Halliday (Asymmetry) as well as playwrights Clarence Coo, James Ijames, and Clare Barron. The award, which recognizes early-career writers of fiction, nonfiction, poetry, and drama, comes with a $50,000 prize. Excerpts from each writer’s work can be read at The Paris Review.


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    ~Nick Moran
  • The outcome of a court judgment concerning a dispute between a dairy company and its delivery drivers hinged on a grammar. Specifically, what does the Oxford comma signify?


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    ~Nick Moran
  • Out this week: Wait Till You See Me Dance by Deb Olin Unferth; Our Short History by Lauren GrodsteinLucky You by Erika CarterAn Arrangement of Skin by Anna JourneyThe River of Kings by Taylor Brown; and More Alive and Less Lonely by Jonathan Lethem. For more on these and other new titles, go read our most recent book preview.


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    ~Thomas Beckwith
  • Albertine Books, the bookshop of the Cultural Services of the French Embassy in New York City, is offering a $10,000 prize aimed at “introducing American readers to the best French-language novels that have been translated into English.” Among the nominees this year is Bardo or Not Bardo by Antoine Volodine, who was recently the subject of a Millions piece.


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    ~Nick Moran
  • “I bet you can relate. Always another crisis, always more costs to keep down. It’s hard to find time for yourself, you know? But the president of the United States should be able to read a book when he wants to. Or at least look at one. Maybe I could just look at this book for a while.”


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    ~Thomas Beckwith
  • “Like reading, love works in roughly the same way every time, but the details of any given case are irreducibly particular, and it’s in the details that everything happens.” Lidija Haas on Elif Batuman’s debut novel, The Idiot. (You could also read our review by Virginia Marshall.)


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    ~Thomas Beckwith

Read More The Millions Top 10 February 2017