Recent Articles

July 23, 2015

Babysitting SEALs 0

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“Write a short story from the point-of-view of a babysitter who one summer night witnesses something she never expected to see in her life, and then do a ‘find and replace’ in your Word doc until each instance of ‘babysitter’ becomes ‘Navy SEAL.’” Leigh Stein shares some “Writing Prompts for Girls and Women” with The […]

July 23, 2015

Help Wanted: The Millions Needs Curiosities and Social Media Interns 0

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The site continues to grow, and that means we have an opportunity to add two more book-loving people to our team.

July 22, 2015

Pentecosts 0

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On bad days, when his writer’s block was at its worst, Hart Crane wrote bizarre, feverish prose poetry as a way of juicing his creative synapses. Understandably, he never published this poetry, but now, thanks to the Harry Ransom Center, we can read it in its original form. Sample quote: “I held the crupper by […]

July 22, 2015

“Style is the writer” 0

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Recommended Reading: Sally Gall’s 2013 interview with the late James Salter.

July 22, 2015

A Literary Mixtape: On ‘New American Stories’ 0

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Here is a snapshot of our time, grim and funny and unreal.

July 22, 2015

True South 0

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Amidst all the controversy surrounding Go Set a Watchman, one question that gets left out is how realistic, exactly, the book is in its depiction of its setting. At Salon, Scott Timberg sits down with Professor Angela Thorburg, who makes a case that regardless of its literary qualities, Watchman is “a very accurate perspective of […]

July 22, 2015

RIP E.L. Doctorow 0

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E.L. Doctorow, the renowned novelist and fiction writer best known for books including Ragtime, Billy Bathgate and the National Book Award-winning World’s Fair, passed away in Manhattan last night at the age of 84. You could read one of our numerous pieces about his work if you’d like to look back on his life and […]

July 22, 2015

America, Meet the Real Atticus Finch 3

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Whatever its true provenance, Go Set a Watchman, despite some deft prose and sharp dialogue, fails as a work of art in every way except as a corrective to the standard sentimental reading of Atticus Finch.

July 21, 2015

Tragedians 0

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As part of their Literary Ladies Cage Fight series, The Butter pitted two of Shakespeare’s most well-known characters against each other, staging contests between Hamlet’s Ophelia and Romeo and Juliet’s Juliet. Who won, you ask? Only one way to find out. You could also read Stefanie Peters on women and Shakespeare’s plays.

July 21, 2015

Cult Classic 0

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Frank Stanford isn’t the most well-known American poet, but he is one of the most revered, at least according to his contemporaries. At The Rumpus, David Biespeil writes about a new collection of the poet’s work, remarking that “no American poet I have ever met regardless of disposition or poetics has disliked Frank Stanford’s poems.”