Recent Articles

March 20, 2015

Confessing / Confiding 0

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“I wanted to offer my students an alternative to the purely confessional mode. I wanted them to write about themselves without falling into a paralyzingly portentous tone. I wanted more humor in their work, more complexity, more detail, more balance—more good writing. I wanted fewer italicized passages, less use of the breathless present tense. I […]

March 20, 2015

The FBI Analyzes Gone Girl 0

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Recommended viewing: an FBI agent takes a look at Amy Dunne’s story from Gone Girl and, surprise!, finds it a little lacking.

March 20, 2015

The Color of Loss: On the Passing of Sir Terry Pratchett 0

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To classify Pratchett is to deny his genius. Just because a book takes place in another world — one with wizards and witches and trolls and dwarfs — doesn’t mean it can’t also provide insight into our own.

March 19, 2015

Lorrie Moore, Short Stories, and America 0

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Good news, fans of short stories, Lorrie Moore, and America! The author is editing a special edition of the Best American series, 100 Years of The Best American Short Stories, to be released in October.

March 19, 2015

Art, Lit, and Finnegans Wake 0

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“I’m a writer through and through, but the art world—to a large extent—provides the arena in which literature can be vigorously addressed, transformed, and expanded.” Frederic Tuten interviews Tom McCarthy about the overlap between the visual arts and literature, the importance of reading, and living, voraciously, and the power of Finnegans Wake for BOMB Magazine. […]

March 19, 2015

Choosing Not to Flee: On Helen Macdonald’s ‘H is for Hawk’ 0

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The echoes of myth in Macdonald’s writing, however subtle and unobtrusive, lend her book an emotional weight usually reserved only for literature, and a grace only for poetry.

March 19, 2015

No Fake Readers 0

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“An appreciation of readers as diverse individuals with different tastes should be a basic tenet of criticism. Instead, it’s common for critics to imagine that their aesthetic preferences are the reflections of “readers” or a special class of readers—“serious readers,” “imaginative readers,” “brave readers,” or some other ill-defined category—whose views truly matter.” Lincoln Michel explains […]

March 19, 2015

Literary Insults 0

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This week in book-related infographics: a look at history’s greatest literary insults, from Capote to Hemingway to Faulkner.

March 19, 2015

Reader, I Muted Him: The Narrative Possibilities of Networked Life 9

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Authors are writing from a networked world and seeing life through that lens whether they allow it to their characters or not. So why not embrace it? Why not make it matter, because it already does however much we doth protest?

March 18, 2015

Just a Tribute 0

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Imagine that someone wrote fan fiction about you. Now imagine this fan fiction is not just about you, but inspired by selfies you posted on Tumblr. This is what happened to Arabelle Sicardi, who talks with Matthew J.X. Malady about the story she received, her fans and the weirdness of Internet fame.