Recent Articles

July 17, 2014

Listening for “Some Late-Summer Evening” 0

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Recommended listening: The Southern Review has released a playlist perfect for summer listening, complete with five poems by Charles Simic.

July 17, 2014

Fifty Shades of Regret 0

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“Shouldn’t we all feel a little embarrassed about the fuss we made over 50 Shades of Grey?” Jessa Crispin writes for the Los Angeles Review of Books about E.L. James’ trilogy and some of the longer responses, including Hard-Core Romance, which we briefly covered a few months ago.

July 17, 2014

The Recuyell Sells 0

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The Recuyell of the Histories of Troye, the first book published in English, recently sold at auction for almost 2 million dollars.

July 17, 2014

Experience + Openness + Neurology 0

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“It’s difficult to pinpoint exactly what makes a great artist creative” but The Atlantic makes a strong attempt and cites the story behind Mary Shelley‘s Frankenstein as an example of what can happen “when experience, openness, and the right neurology come together.”

July 17, 2014

A Vanished World of Readers: On Joanna Rakoff’s My Salinger Year 0

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A less-heralded casualty of the digital age is the disintegration of the lower rungs of the ladder that have long led young, smart readers into the caste of professional tastemakers.

July 16, 2014

Book-barfly recommends 0

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What could be better than a summer evening with a tasty book and a witty drink? In The Spectator, various bookworms meditate on their experiences with literature and alcohol. Pair with a gorgeous essay on summer reading in The Paris Review: “books are a kind of island.”

July 16, 2014

The future of the crossword 0

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Crosswords in print newspapers are declining alongside print newspapers, but there may yet be a promising future in mobile apps.

July 16, 2014

Twitter: like a teenager high on Valium 1

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This week, David Mitchell (author of Cloud Atlas and the forthcoming The Bone Clocks) is releasing a new short story over 280 tweets (which you can read here). Form follows content, he explains, since his narrator is a teenager high on his mother’s Valium. Mitchell joins good company: Teju Cole, Junot Diaz, and other notables have tried their hand with this strange new form. Pair with: a stroll […]

July 16, 2014

“The sanitising effect of augury” 0

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In a time of crisis, any decision is better than no decision at all. That line–credited to Theodore Roosevelt–is pop conventional wisdom. An excellent piece at Aeon explores the full implications of the line, and may just convince you that your next impossible choice should be made by a soothsayer, a lottery, or a flipped coin.

July 16, 2014

The Dungeon Master’s Workshop 0

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Junot Diaz, author of Pulitzer-winning The Brief Wondrous Life of Oscar Wao, started his auspicious career in the most unlikely of imaginary places: crafting stories for his friends in the tabletop roleplay game Dungeons & Dragons.