Recent Articles

May 14, 2015

On The Notebook 0

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“The notebook is where our interior world makes contact with our exterior world; where our instinct for creation is first made material. Our notebooks are our first messy attempts at self-expression, and the ways in which we express ourselves are changing every day.” Sarah Gerard explores the life of the notebook in an essay for […]

May 14, 2015

A Girl and Her Books: On the Loss of Sweet Briar College 8

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Sofia could live her entire life in a library and never be tired of books, of the smell of ink on paper, the weight of a book in her hand, or the things you learn in their pages.

May 14, 2015

A Kindle Inheritance 0

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Recommended reading: Nick Bilton on inheriting his mother’s library and the essential difference between print and digital books.

May 14, 2015

Breakfast: A Love Story 2

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Literature and breakfast are both slow arts. Early morning arts that unfold while the world is still groggy and optimistic.

May 13, 2015

Colonized 0

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A Canadian Ph.D. student wrote (and successfully defended!) a 52,000 word dissertation that features almost no punctuation. Titled “Indigenous Architecture through Indigenous Knowledge,” the dissertation has no periods, commas or semi-colons, a choice intended to “make a point” about colonial and aboriginal identity. Canada’s National Post has the story.

May 13, 2015

The Hellman’s Virgin 0

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Recommended Reading: Ottessa Moshfegh on eating mayonnaise for the first time.

May 13, 2015

Down in the Oedipal Mud: On Kent Russell’s ‘I Am Sorry to Think I Have Raised a Timid Son’ 13

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Kent Russell, like John Jeremiah Sullivan, never adopts the let’s-laugh-at-the-Clampetts pose common to inferior writers of inferior non-fiction.

May 13, 2015

Out of Nowhere 0

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Nell Zink, whose second novel comes out next week, has one of the lit world’s more unusual origin stories. An expat in Germany, she wrote her first novel in three weeks, after striking up a friendship over email with Jonathan Franzen. In the latest New Yorker, Kathryn Schulz details her story in full. You could […]

May 13, 2015

For the Cause 0

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As the 20th century wore on, the Strugatsky brothers grew pessimistic about Soviet Communism, eventually turning their fictional worlds from socialist utopias to dystopias. Their most famous early novel, Noon: 22nd Century bears little resemblance to later works like Hard to Be a God, which implicitly criticizes the Soviet government. At The Paris Review Daily, Ezra […]

May 13, 2015

The Millions Top Ten: April 2015 4

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Major shake-ups this month as we bid adieu to three Top Ten fixtures of the past six months.