Recent Articles

July 12, 2014

“Jeff Koons poses next to a pig, grinning” 0

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The recent opening of the Jeff Koons retrospective at the Whitney Museum of American Art has occasioned a number of rave reviews. They’re so good, in fact, that they’ve inspired Los Angeles Times writer Carolina A. Miranda to comb the write-ups for “evocative turn[s] of phrase, political metaphor[s], and references to lady parts” in order […]

July 12, 2014

Maybe His Advice Isn’t So Great After All 0

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You might think that the co-author of Fiesta: How to Survive the Bulls of Pamplona would be able to partake in the Spanish city’s annual event without suffering any injuries. Unfortunately for Bill Hillmann, that’s not the case.

July 11, 2014

“I’ll die soon, said / the boy to the bird.” 0

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Recommended Reading: Two poems by Slovene poet Tomaž Šalamun.

July 11, 2014

Renowned Cuban Poet Resigns from Nation’s Association of Writers and Artists 0

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Rafael Alcides Perez, one of Cuba’s most renowned poets and public intellectuals, has resigned from the Association of Cuban Writers and Artists because of “government restrictions he is being subjected to,” reports the Havana Times. You can read some of his work (in Spanish) over here, here, and here.

July 11, 2014

Lost Irish Film Recovered 1

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During the production of his classic film, Man of Aran, Robert Flaherty also directed an 11-minute short entitled Oidhche Sheanchais (“A Night of Storytelling”). It’s widely considered to be the first film recorded in the Irish language. For years, all extant copies were believed to be lost in a fire, but recently, researchers at Harvard’s […]

July 11, 2014

You’re (Printed In) Carcosa Now 0

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The Only RX Press is calling for short stories between 1,000 and 3,000 words “related to or inspired by True Detective.” (Related: Our own Ujala Sehgal recommended five crime novels in which the women are the true detectives.)

July 11, 2014

Édouard Levé’s “Monstrous Paradox.” 0

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Millions staffer Mark O’Connell recently took a look at Édouard Levé’s Works. “For the most part, it’s a catalogue of unrealized creativity,” he writes. “Which in the very extensiveness of its cataloging becomes a monstrous paradox of realized creativity.” (Related: O’Connell previously reviewed Levé’s Suicide and Autoportrait for our site.)

July 11, 2014

July Books: Reading for the Month of Revolutions 0

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Here is a list of suggested reading for the heat and upheaval of July.

July 10, 2014

Mrs. Dalloway’s Privacy 0

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Joshua Rothman writes for The New Yorker about Virginia Woolf, Mrs. Dalloway, privacy and “a gift that you’ve been given, which you must hold onto and treasure but never open.”

July 10, 2014

The History of the Blurb 0

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What if Petrarch had blurbed The Divine Comedy, or Shakespeare, “author of Tony Award-winning sensation Hamlet,” had reviewed Don Quixote? Tom Rachman imagines these blurbs and more for The Rumpus, and his piece pairs well with our brief history of the blurb.