Recent Articles

February 20, 2014

The Haints of Language 0

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“Sometimes dialect is the only way a person can stay rooted to family, to community, to everything that is familiar in a fast-changing world where nothing is certain,” Amy Clark writes at The New York Times. She gives some tips on when and how to use dialect in your writing for the best and least […]

February 20, 2014

A Physics of the Heart: On Grief, M-Theory, and Skippy Dies 6

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Some branches of physics suggest that we live today in a multiverse. Within the multiverse, our universe is one of many. One variation of string theory holds that all possible outcomes of an event actually happen, across different universes. In this universe, my friends are dead, but in a parallel universe, they decided to sleep in, or to let the driver drive, or to return the suicide package when it came in the mail.

February 20, 2014

The Millions Top Ten: January 2014 0

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Gridlock atop the list and an unexpected debut.

February 19, 2014

The Right Kind of Ambivalence 0

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In the latest entry in By Heart, which I’ve written about before, Thirty Girls author Susan Minot explains why she prefers to read multiple books at once instead of reading through single books from start to finish. Her reasoning? Books are “worlds to dip in and out of, and my relationship to them is continually […]

February 19, 2014

Nothing to Say 0

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“The first section of the book inevitably ends up taking on a Rashomon-ic quality, as Sotatsu’s father, mother, brother and sister all get their say about what transpired during his time in prison, along with a prison guard who observed him. But [Jesse] Ball doesn’t let them fall into the he said-she said realm of […]

February 19, 2014

Bound and (Un)gagged: Why Orange Is the New Black Appeals to Us Outside 2

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Like much current prison literature, Orange is the New Black seeks strenuously – and tellingly – to reaffirm the triumph of the human spirit. Rather than dwell on her misfortune or become too accustomed to prison life, Piper Kerman stages a protest, Oprah-style: no one can keep her down.

February 19, 2014

Waterlogged 0

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As you might expect, the literature of England is characterized by a fair amount of rain, but what’s interesting is that the Victorian era had the rainiest literature of all. In The Guardian, a look into the history of downpours and drizzles in English narratives. (via Arts and Letters Daily)

February 19, 2014

A New Robert Galbraith Novel 0

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You may have heard that J.K. Rowling published a crime novel last year under the pen name Robert Galbraith. According to her alter ego’s website, Rowling will publish another novel as Galbraith, one featuring (again) the private investigator Cormoran Strike. (If you missed it, you should definitely read Elizabeth Minkel’s recent piece on Ron/Hermione and authorial […]

February 19, 2014

RIP Mavis Gallant 1

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The Canadian writer Mavis Gallant passed away on Tuesday morning at the age of 91. A frequent New Yorker contributor, Gallant published two novels and ten volumes of short fiction in her lifetime, one of which, Home Truths, won the Governor General’s Award. The Globe and Mail’s obituary describes her as having “a journalist’s nose, a […]

February 19, 2014

Cooking with Hemingway 10

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I couldn’t question Hemingway’s mastery of prose. His pancake recipe inspired less confidence.