Recent Articles

June 25, 2015

Ancient Arts: On Independent Catholic Literature and Edward Mullany’s ‘The Three Sunrises’ 3

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In the present literary moment, earnest religious belief is a subversive, counter-cultural move. God is not absent, but God seems more ironic metaphor than serious matter.

June 24, 2015

Point Scoring 0

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You may like Scrabble, but are you a Scrabble enthusiast? True devotees of the game amass huge vocabularies of odd and high-scoring words. In The New Republic, Sam Eifling reviews Word Nerd, a new book about the game’s top players.

June 24, 2015

Ugly Mugs 0

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Recommended Reading: Walker Rutter-Bowman on Arthur Bradford’s Turtleface and Beyond. Pair with Jonathan Russell Clark’s review of the book.

June 24, 2015

Small Victories, Large Discoveries: On Fishes, Ponds, and Finding Open Spaces 0

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That not all good or great art is recognized is easy to forget. We can too readily entrust tastemakers of the day — the Academie of 1874 France, A-list publishing houses and magazines, even the Twitter kings and queens — to point us to ideas, works, and forms that are worthwhile.

June 24, 2015

Luck Runs Out 0

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As Amy Bloom remembers it, the inspiration for her most recent novel came from two sources: the mythos of Old Hollywood and the criminal history of her own family. In The Guardian, she recounts the genesis of Lucky Us, with brief descriptions of her family’s rap sheet.

June 24, 2015

Failsafe 0

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In 1979, William Gaddis taught a course at Bard College on “The Literature of Failure,” examining works that somehow focused on personal failure or insufficiency. These included, among other books, Joan Didion’s Play It as It Lays, as well as Dale Carnegie’s How to Win Friends and Influence People. In Bookforum, Casey Michael Henry takes […]

June 24, 2015

Dynamite Detroit Debut: On Angela Flournoy’s ‘The Turner House’ 0

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There are many sentences in The Turner House that nail a sense of place with a precision long-time Detroiters like Elmore Leonard or Donald Goines would have envied.

June 23, 2015

Fatal 0

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As titles go, it’s hard to get more straightforward than England and Other Stories, the new collection by Graham Swift. In the Times, Michiko Kakutani provides her verdict, lauding Swift for his ability to paint “vistas as panoramic as those in the stories of Alice Munro.”

June 23, 2015

Book Learnin’ 0

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“This is the first time that the college has embarked on such a robust process for measuring Core Educational Competency In Reading Things In Books And Writing About Them, and we really can’t do it without your mandated participation. We have devised this rubric in consultation with the Office of Institutional Research About the Institution, […]

June 23, 2015

Stir Gently 0

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Cookbooks, in general, are resistant to close reading, if only because their authors are barely present in the text, if at all. Yet sometimes we can discern a personality through the measurements and shopping lists. At Page-Turner, Kathleen Alcott reads the cookbooks of Nigel Slater. Pair with our own Hannah Gersen on reading cookbooks as […]