Recent Articles

April 11, 2017

A Conversation with Morgan Parker 0

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On his podcast, David Naimon spoke with poet Morgan Parker about her new collection, There Are More Beautiful Things Than Beyoncé. It’s a book “at the intersections of mythology and sorrow, of vulnerability and posturing, of desire and disgust, of tragedy and excellence,” Naimon says. (Bonus: Parker’s book was recently featured in Nick Ripatrazone’s list of five […]

April 11, 2017

The 2017 International DUBLIN Literary Award Shortlist 0

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The world’s most valuable annual literary award for a single work of fiction published in English.

April 11, 2017

Tuesday New Release Day: Thiong’o; Mason; Gerard; Romm; Grøndahl; Grant 0

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Out this week: Devil on the Cross by Ngũgĩ wa Thiong’o; Void Star by Zachary Mason; Sunshine State by Sarah Gerard; Double Bind, edited by Robin Romm; Often I Am Happy by Jens Christian Grøndahl; and Cave Dwellers by Richard Grant. For more on these and other new titles, go read our most recent book preview.

April 11, 2017

Zone of Strangeness: On John Cheever’s Subjective Suburbs 2

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It is the tension between two countervailing urges — the urge for freedom and the urge for safety — that lends Cheever’s work much of its enduring power.

April 10, 2017

The 2017 Pulitzer Prize for Fiction Goes to Colson Whitehead 25

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The Pulitzer jury named Colson Whitehead’s The Underground Railroad this year’s winner in the fiction category.

April 10, 2017

Grey Skies, Small Island Towns, and Gangsters: On Tartan Noir 0

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Tartan is the pattern on shortbread tins, or the hairy friendly blanket my dog sleeps on. There’s a something of a disconnect between the warmth of Tartan and the broken-glass cold of noir — and that makes the term work.

April 10, 2017

The New York Times Broadens Book Coverage 1

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The New York Times is broadening its book coverage by adding more staffers and launching three new features: a literary advice column, a weekly Q&A about writing processes, and a column looking at “contemporary issues through the lens of recent and historical books.”

April 10, 2017

Little Prince, Lots of Translation 0

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This month, Antoine de Saint-Exupéry’s iconic children’s book Le Petit Prince will be translated into Hassanya, a rural Arabic dialect spoken in portions of Mauritania, Morocco, Algeria, Senegal, and Mali. This marks the 300th translation of the book.

April 10, 2017

Eight for Eight: A Literary Reader for Passover 1

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What follows is a literary sampling inspired by Pesach: eight books for the eight nights of the holiday, choices that amplify Passover themes and honor writing itself.

April 9, 2017

Dead Father 0

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Recommended Reading: Susan Choi on a resurrected stage adaptation of Donald Barthelme’s novel Snow White.