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December 11, 2016

A Year in Reading: Claire Cameron 0

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These are poems I wish for my younger self to read. The arc, told over four parts — the hurting, the loving, the breaking, the healing — is different to the world I knew, especially the healing part. It is not a story about fitting into someone else’s world, but about how to imagine your own.

December 11, 2016

A Year in Reading: Il’ja Rákoš 8

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We read and write for largely the same principal reason the ancients did: because, good Lord, we’re a damn mess. If 2016 hasn’t convinced you, I’m not sure what it will take.

December 11, 2016

A Year in Reading: Hannah Gersen 10

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The day after the election, in an attempt to find some equilibrium, I returned to In Search of Lost Time. The scene I read happened to be one in which Baron de Charlus misreads a social situation and as a result, loses the person he loves most dearly. His error is a familiar one: he doesn’t observe or even suspect the simmering resentment of someone else.

December 10, 2016

A Year in Reading: Kaulie Lewis 0

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The essays are almost meaty, thick with her usual intelligence and insight, quiet and calm on the surface but deep in both feeling and meaning. I couldn’t walk away from these and come back to find them unchanged.

December 10, 2016

A Year in Reading: Nick Ripatrazone 0

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Robinson is the type of writer who makes me want to slow down, sit down, and calm down.

December 10, 2016

A Year in Reading: Zoë Ruiz 0

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In 2017, I want to read books that help further the idea that both whiteness and white dominance are not inevitable, and I want to read books that help me understand how exactly we got to the place that we are in now.

December 10, 2016

A Year in Reading: Emily St. John Mandel 2

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The premise is harrowing, the prose is stark and beautiful, the plotting is impeccable, and there’s something utterly heartbreaking in El Akkad’s subtle rendition of the ways in which war shapes the human soul.

December 9, 2016

A Year in Reading: Mauro Javier Cardenas 0

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Porpora demonstrates how easy it is for citizens to shirk responsibility for horrendous acts enacted by their government and asks whether the United States became a party to a genocide-like event in Central America (the answer is yes).

December 9, 2016

On Optimism and Despair 2

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“In your earlier novels you sounded so optimistic, but now your books are tinged with despair. Is this fair to say?” Zadie Smith‘s remarks upon accepting the 2016 Welt Literature Prize on November 10th, and the question of whether “multiculturalism” is a failed experiment. Read our review of Smith’s latest novel, Swing Time, here.

December 9, 2016

Why Words Matter 0

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“The hijacking of public language, as is happening now, is a way to shift perception—to bend and control thought—and must be resisted.” Summer Brennan pens a powerful first entry for her twice-monthly column about language and power at The Literary Hub. Read also our own Lydia Kiesling, who tells us, “I have to believe that literature can be a […]