Recent Articles

March 21, 2017

The Man Behind the Masks: On Nabokov’s Forewords 4

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After all the humorous huffing and puffing, all the tricks and traps and underhand maneuvers on the author’s part, the forewords exist, after all, to locate the English-language versions of Nabokov’s books within the context of a person in exile.

March 21, 2017

Tuesday New Release Day: Unferth; Grodstein; Carter; Journey; Brown; Lethem 0

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Out this week: Wait Till You See Me Dance by Deb Olin Unferth; Our Short History by Lauren Grodstein; Lucky You by Erika Carter; An Arrangement of Skin by Anna Journey; The River of Kings by Taylor Brown; and More Alive and Less Lonely by Jonathan Lethem. For more on these and other new titles, go read our most recent book preview.

March 20, 2017

New Prize for French Literature 0

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Albertine Books, the bookshop of the Cultural Services of the French Embassy in New York City, is offering a $10,000 prize aimed at “introducing American readers to the best French-language novels that have been translated into English.” Among the nominees this year is Bardo or Not Bardo by Antoine Volodine, who was recently the subject […]

March 20, 2017

Chasing Hemingway’s Ghost in Havana 0

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In Havana, the spirit of Hemingway endures, much like the architecture of the city itself, a fading reminder of what was and what might have been.

March 19, 2017

The Eternal Struggle 0

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“I bet you can relate. Always another crisis, always more costs to keep down. It’s hard to find time for yourself, you know? But the president of the United States should be able to read a book when he wants to. Or at least look at one. Maybe I could just look at this book […]

March 18, 2017

Boiled Down 0

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“Like reading, love works in roughly the same way every time, but the details of any given case are irreducibly particular, and it’s in the details that everything happens.” Lidija Haas on Elif Batuman’s debut novel, The Idiot. (You could also read our review by Virginia Marshall.)

March 18, 2017

Sense and Senility 0

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What kind of writer would Jane Austen have been if she’d lived beyond her forties? We can never know, but Freya Johnston has some ideas.

March 17, 2017

Go Figure 0

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Our friends at Bloom launched a new feature, “Go Figure,” which seeks to “explore the portrayal of mathematics and science in fiction and literature … to uncover … deeply emotional and naturally creative connections.”

March 17, 2017

The League of Extraordinary Critics 0

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Hume was sued after putting George Plimpton in a chokehold, convinced that one of the dilettante’s witticisms was cribbed from a Martial epigram. Hume wouldn’t release him until two Commentary editors and William Styron assured him that the bon mot was most definitely a Plimpton original.

March 16, 2017

An Inside Job: Lessons from Watergate for the Trump Era 1

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Since much of the material being leaked about alleged connections between Trump and Russia involves classified national security matters, Trump can plausibly threaten to prosecute the leakers. And, unlike Nixon, Trump has a stalwart Republican majority in both houses of Congress.