Recent Articles

September 23, 2009

#9: Hateship, Friendship, Courtship, Loveship, Marriage by Alice Munro 0

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Alice Munro has taught us to find literary pleasure in leaping over time, in the odd swerves life takes, in the unexpected sources of comfort and sustenance, and in the idiosyncratic arrangements made for human happiness.

September 23, 2009

#10: Never Let Me Go by Kazuo Ishiguro 1

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This book made me cry for days.

September 22, 2009

What’s Your Top 5? 0

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We’ll be revealing the top 5 vote getters in our “Best Fiction of the Millenium (So Far)” poll on Thursday and Friday. We’d love to hear your predictions here.

September 22, 2009

An Interview With Marilynne Robinson 0

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Read here, in the University of Washington’s alumni magazine, about how Marilynne Robinson approaches a book’s essence as “an elaborate needlepoint of decisions and observations”; how novels visit upon her as surprises; and how her recent move to New York might spawn yet another gift to readers.

September 22, 2009

#11: The Brief, Wondrous Life of Oscar Wao by Junot Díaz 6

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I grabbed it, flipped open to the directed page–and found there one perfect sentence.

September 22, 2009

Multi-Talented Nick Cave 0

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You have to be a little in awe of the multi-disciplinary artist.  Musician Nick Cave, who made his screenwriting debut with The Proposition, talks to the New Yorkerabout his new novel, The Death of Bunny Munro, as well as the multi-media audio book version.

September 22, 2009

#12: Twilight of the Superheroes by Deborah Eisenberg 0

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Life is impossible; it can’t possibly continue; and then it does.

September 22, 2009

#13: Mortals by Norman Rush 9

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The story of hapless CIA functionary Ray Finch’s midlife unraveling in Botswana is uproarious and deadly serious, ruminative and suspenseful, psychological and philosophical. Think Graham Greene as written by Saul Bellow. Or Thomas Mann as written by Jonathan Franzen.

September 22, 2009

Tuesday Means New Releases 0

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Two hotly anticipate works by literary masters hit shelves this week. Both were “most anticipated books.” We have The Year of the Flood by Margaret Atwood and Nocturnes by Kazuo Ishiguro. The latter was written about persuasively by Lydia in recent weeks.

September 22, 2009

#14: Atonement by Ian McEwan 1

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Atonement is a gut-punch of a book that toys with the idea of the reliable narrator and gets one thinking about the ethics of story-telling and the power that a writer has to bend history to his will.