Recent Articles

November 13, 2007

A Feast of Comics Goes Online 0

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Now, this sounds like a good idea: Marvel Comics announced today that is has put more than 2,500 comic books online with more to come. The idea is that with a subscription, readers can get unlimited access to the online comic vault. Clearly Marvel’s still working out the bugs – I tried to view some […]

November 11, 2007

From the Dark Corners of the Library 1

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Where’s Arthur’s Gerbil?; A Pictorial Book of Tongue Coating; The Fangs of Suet Pudding: all real books apparently. Inspired by Bizarre Books: A Compendium of Classic Oddities, a new book collecting history’s odd, obscure, and weird volumes, the Atlanta Journal-Constitution’s Book Page is soliciting strange book titles from readers. The first entry might be the […]

November 11, 2007

The Little Strike That Could Do What, Exactly? 3

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The ripples from the Hollywood writers’ strike are felt well outside of the Hollywood pool. Broadway has gone darker than the plot of a Eugene O’Neill play as the stagehands show their solidarity. Production workers for NBC’s “The Office” are out on their ear. Ellen DeGeneres caught in the middle (She and Oprah have both […]

November 10, 2007

So Long, Sweet Scientist: Norman Mailer Dies at 84 6

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Norman Mailer, a colossus who bestrode worlds both literary and journalistic – and, at his best, combined them – has died of acute renal failure, according to the Times. Mailer had been in poor health for some time, and, given his hospitalization last month and his advanced age, his death comes as no surprise. And […]

November 8, 2007

Laura Ingalls Wilder Revisited 2

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Though the Washington Post’s Jonathan Yardley isn’t the most “sexy” of critics (Pete Dexter’s comments notwithstanding), I’ve always enjoyed his columns. He will champion anything he believes is worth reading, even naming a book by John Grisham as one of the “best” of the year in 2005. He also clearly loves to read, and it […]

November 7, 2007

Beowulf on the Big Screen 0

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Seamus Heaney’s seminal 2000 translation of the Old English epic Beowulf brought the work, first put to paper by an unknown Anglo-Saxon about a thousand years ago, into the 21st century. Heaney considers Beowulf “one of the foundation works of poetry in English.” Now that cornerstone is getting the Hollywood treatment, and, as you might […]

November 7, 2007

Modern In A Post-Modern World 3

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There’s an old Woody Allen nightclub routine, dating back to his stand-up days in the mid-60s, that goes a little like this: “I was in Europe many years ago with Ernest Hemingway. Hemingway had just written his first novel, and Gertrude Stein and I read it, and we said that is was a good novel, […]

November 7, 2007

Bookslut, All is Forgiven 0

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Bookslut, I know we’ve had our differences in the past, but after this, all is forgiven.

November 6, 2007

Hatfields, McCoys, and Book Banning 1

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Pat Conroy recently unleashed a verbal beating on a West Virginia school district that, prodded by complaints from parents, suspended the teaching of two of his novels. English teachers, in particular, will smile when they read this. It begins: I received an urgent e-mail from a high school student named Makenzie Hatfield of Charleston, West […]

November 5, 2007

Gladwell is Back 0

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Both on his blog and in The New Yorker.