Recent Articles

April 20, 2011

Writing About Home in Pittsburgh 0

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A nice complement to Edan’s essay today about writing in Los Angeles, The Metropolis Case author Matthew Gallaway writes about the challenges of representing his home city of Pittsburgh in his fiction. “For starters, there’s the question of accuracy.”

April 20, 2011

Egan’s Reactions to Pulitzer 0

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Moments after A Visit From the Goon Squad was announced as the recipient of the Pulitzer Prize for Fiction, Jennifer Egan answers a few questions about her reactions to the news. (via @The_Rumpus)

April 20, 2011

n+1: The Singles 1

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Millions fave n+1 has begun putting out a series of mini-ebooks via Kindle Singles. Three are available thus far: “Octomom and the Politics of Babies” by Mark Grief, “Gatsby in New Delhi” by Siddhartha Deb, and “Argentinidad” by Benjamin Kunkel.

April 20, 2011

Going Native: Writing Place in Los Angeles 32

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The distance any of us non-New York writers have from New York is frustrating, but also valuable. There’s an option to retreat from the noise–or, okay, the music–that I don’t think a writer in, say, Brooklyn has. This distance has benefited me for the last four years, as I write and write, without looking up, or around, me.

April 20, 2011

Questioning the Quotidian: Georges Perec’s The Art of Asking Your Boss for a Raise 1

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Perec’s answer is to dwell on our routines and to realize the intricacies of the everyday.

April 19, 2011

The Kindle Will Disappear Your Old Magazines 2

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Gizmodo discovers that when you cancel a Kindle magazine subscription all the back issues that you’ve accumulated disappear.

April 19, 2011

How Avant Is It? Zadie Smith, Tom McCarthy, and the Novel’s Way Forward 25

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Huge claims have been made on behalf of the novelist Tom McCarthy. But what do they actually tell us about “the future of fiction?”

April 19, 2011

The James Joyce Book Club: Julian Rios’s The House of Ulysses 1

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Ulysses is the literary equivalent of Angkor Wat or Machu Picchu or any of the world’s other great, beautiful, challenging locations.  Just as there are guides, travelogues and travel television shows designed to communicate a flavor of those locations while providing the traveler with the tools needed to actually visit them, there are guides and […]

April 19, 2011

Tuesday New Release Day: Phillips, Tillman, Bender 0

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Probably the biggest literary debut the week is Arthur Phillips’ The Tragedy of Arthur, a faux memoir about the surfacing of a long-lost Shakespeare play. Also out this week is the first book from former Soft Skull head Richard Nash’s new venture Red Lemonade: Lynne Tillman’s Someday This Will Be Funny. And, finally, now out […]

April 18, 2011

Civil War Lit Reconsidered 1

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While there may not be any great literature from the Civil War period about the war itself, the war did leave an indelible mark on some of the great American writers toiling at the time. Craig Fehrman explores the topic at The Boston Globe.