Recent Articles

August 3, 2009

Writing for Free 5

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This HuffPo writer is right. Not paying writers is not a business model. Or if it is, it’s not a sustainable model. She touches on many good points in this debate, namely that only those that can afford to write for free will do so, meaning that we’ll increasingly be hearing from the idle rich […]

August 3, 2009

The Millions Top Ten: July 2009 – And Introducing the Hall of Fame 3

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We spend plenty of time here on The Millions telling all of you what we’ve been reading, but we are also quite interested in hearing about what you’ve been reading. By looking at our Amazon stats, we can see what books Millions readers have been buying, and we decided it would be fun to use […]

August 2, 2009

Curiosities: The Bowflex of Bookishness 0

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The August issue of Open Letters is available. Nestled amidst the literary fare are early Oscar nominations from Sarah Hudson and a piece on the video game The Sims by Phillip A. Lobo. Electric Literature teamed up with animator Jonathan Ashley and musician Nick DeWitt to produce an animated trailer for Jim Shepard’s “Your Fate […]

July 31, 2009

My Future Nemesis 8

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When I was in graduate school, a good friend of mine decided I needed a nemesis. She already had one – or many, depending on the day – but my particular nemesis would be chosen on aesthetic grounds. This would be a classmate whose work in some way hurt my own: their short stories and […]

July 30, 2009

Debut Booker Longlister Subject of Controversy Online and Off 2

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Most of the Booker longlisters are fairly well-known, and (as of this writing) all of them, save three, have their own Wikipedia pages. However, one of those three has actually been the subject of a Wikipedia war over the last few years, and his page was deleted after months of contentious argument. Ed O’Loughlin is […]

July 30, 2009

Parker’s Back… The Anthology: Seeking the Literarily Tattooed 0

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If you’ve got a portrait of Pushkin on your back or the complete text of The Waste Land on your shins, aspiring anthologists Justin Taylor and Eva Talmadge want you! Here’s their call for images of literary tattoos: We are seeking high quality photographs of your literary tattoos for an upcoming book. Send us your […]

July 29, 2009

Booker Prize Odds and More 1

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The Booker longlist was announced yesterday. Going over the list, I noted that it didn’t seem very multi-cultural. One of the interesting things about the Booker is that any author from the Commonwealth of Nations or from Ireland is eligible. This means that any of 54 countries might send a writer to Booker glory. This […]

July 29, 2009

Geometric Solids: Thomas Hardy’s Far From the Madding Crowd 6

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I first heard about Thomas Hardy’s Far From the Madding Crowd about twenty years ago, when I was in seventh or eighth grade. My classmates and I were all reading Stephen King and Dean R. Koontz, and our English teacher attempted to guide our reading choices to higher-brow material. “I think it’s great that you’re […]

July 28, 2009

The Booker’s Dozen: The 2009 Booker Longlist 1

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With the unveiling of the Booker Prize longlist, the 2009 literary Prize season is officially underway. As usual, we have a mix of exciting new names, relative unknowns and venerable standbys. The big names that will stand out are J.M. Coetzee, a two-time winner of the prize, A.S. Byatt, William Trevor, Colm Toibin, and Hillary […]

July 28, 2009

The Past as Destiny, The Place as Self: Orhan Pamuk’s Istanbul 0

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Lacar Musgrove Lacar Musgrove is the associate non-fiction editor of Bayou Magazine, published by the University of New Orleans, where she is pursuing an M.F.A. She has a B.A. in English from Boston University. Orhan Pamuk’s Istanbul: Memories and the City is a strange and fascinating self-portrait. The first time I read Orhan Pamuk’s Istanbul […]