Recent Articles

December 3, 2010

A Year in Reading: Joshua Cohen 4

by

The reason is C.M. Doughty’s prose, said to have shaped, like wind shapes rock, Henry Green’s and T.E. Lawrence’s.

December 2, 2010

A Year in Reading: Emma Rathbone 6

by

It fulfilled a need for British postwar spinster fiction I didn’t know I had.

December 2, 2010

A Symmetrical but Opposite Study of Darkness and Light 0

by

“I was also deeply protective of my father, who at the time of my reading was struggling with illness and other demons. Yet I saw painfully how he could also be a figure of fun. It dawned on me that Cal, supposedly a great friend, might be mocking him—even just by writing about his mockery […]

December 2, 2010

In Translation 0

by

At Salonica, a holiday gift guide for lovers of international literature.

December 2, 2010

A Year in Reading: Lionel Shriver 2

by

To get me through a 550-page collection, the stories must be very good indeed. These are.

December 2, 2010

What We Talk About When We Talk About Books 0

by

“The [book] review’s pre-eminence is irrefutable: most people are acquainted with far, far more books through reviews than they could ever hope to read. And that is, generally, to the good.” Joseph Mackin explores why we write and read book reviews for the New York Journal of Books.

December 2, 2010

The Bad Sex Award 0

by

What’s it like to win the Literary Review‘s Bad Sex award? As 2010 “winner” Rowan Somerville reports, “It’s a hard pill to swallow … Despite the magazine’s assertion that ‘it’s only a bit of fun’ there’s an atmosphere of bullying peculiar to public schools about the whole thing.”

December 2, 2010

A Year in Reading: Al Jaffee 0

by

The atmosphere he has created in his drawings is entirely accurate. The architecture and the clothing of the people rings true.

December 1, 2010

The Magnetic Fields: Rock’s Most Bookish Band? 0

by

At the NYRB, the Magnetic Fields’ Claudia Gonson offers a sort of “Life in Reading”: “I was very into Lord Jim for a year.”

December 1, 2010

A Year in Reading: John Banville 1

by

These four long essays are remarkable for their sanity and clear-sightedness.