Recent Articles

July 30, 2009

Parker’s Back… The Anthology: Seeking the Literarily Tattooed 0

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If you’ve got a portrait of Pushkin on your back or the complete text of The Waste Land on your shins, aspiring anthologists Justin Taylor and Eva Talmadge want you! Here’s their call for images of literary tattoos: We are seeking high quality photographs of your literary tattoos for an upcoming book. Send us your […]

July 29, 2009

Booker Prize Odds and More 1

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The Booker longlist was announced yesterday. Going over the list, I noted that it didn’t seem very multi-cultural. One of the interesting things about the Booker is that any author from the Commonwealth of Nations or from Ireland is eligible. This means that any of 54 countries might send a writer to Booker glory. This […]

July 29, 2009

Geometric Solids: Thomas Hardy’s Far From the Madding Crowd 6

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I first heard about Thomas Hardy’s Far From the Madding Crowd about twenty years ago, when I was in seventh or eighth grade. My classmates and I were all reading Stephen King and Dean R. Koontz, and our English teacher attempted to guide our reading choices to higher-brow material. “I think it’s great that you’re […]

July 28, 2009

The Booker’s Dozen: The 2009 Booker Longlist 1

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With the unveiling of the Booker Prize longlist, the 2009 literary Prize season is officially underway. As usual, we have a mix of exciting new names, relative unknowns and venerable standbys. The big names that will stand out are J.M. Coetzee, a two-time winner of the prize, A.S. Byatt, William Trevor, Colm Toibin, and Hillary […]

July 28, 2009

The Past as Destiny, The Place as Self: Orhan Pamuk’s Istanbul 0

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Lacar Musgrove Lacar Musgrove is the associate non-fiction editor of Bayou Magazine, published by the University of New Orleans, where she is pursuing an M.F.A. She has a B.A. in English from Boston University. Orhan Pamuk’s Istanbul: Memories and the City is a strange and fascinating self-portrait. The first time I read Orhan Pamuk’s Istanbul […]

July 27, 2009

At the London Review of Books: Clancy Martin on Alcoholism 2

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In the LRB this month, professor and novelist Clancy Martin offers a brutally candid account of his own attempts to get sober. The piece is affecting, horrifying, and enlightening: As a child I visited my older sister in a psychiatric hospital, but I hadn’t been inside one for 30 years. Then, on 1 January this […]

July 27, 2009

Revisiting a Literary Throwdown: Zombie Books for Free 1

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It was a battle between an evangelizing visionary and a sage defender of the past, perhaps the first big tussle in the great sorting out of publishing’s new look in the digital age. This was 2006, when Wired Magazine technology evangelist Kevin Kelly wrote about the helter skelter future of books in the digital age. […]

July 26, 2009

Pynchon by Way of ‘Sally Forth’ 0

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Readers of the Sunday funnies may have spotted an odd juxtaposition somewhere between “Garfield” and “Beetle Bailey” this morning. “Sally Forth” writer Ces Marciuliano has reimagined the opening lines of Pynchon’s postmodern classic Gravity’s Rainbow as a baseball-themed essay by grade-schooler Hilary. We will be running an essay here on literary mashups tomorrow, but this […]

July 25, 2009

A First Look Through the Looking Glass: Tim Burton’s Alice in Wonderland 2

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Tim Burton and Disney have released the first images of Burton’s forthcoming (March 2010) take on Lewis Carroll’s 19th century children’s classic Alice in Wonderland – and they’re spectacular. Johnny Depp will play the Mad Hatter, Helena Bonham Carter (also Burton’s wife) will play the Red Queen, Anne Hathaway will play the White Queen, and […]

July 24, 2009

Torch Ballads & Jukebox Music #4: Serenaded by Jonathan Richman 2

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Jonathan Richman, along with his long-time drummer Tommy Larkins, took the stage, strummed his acoustic guitar and began to sing. Nothing. The mikes weren’t working. Where other performers, and indeed lesser legends, might have turned diva, Jonathan simply announced – loudly, to make up for the microphone – that he and the techies would confer […]