Recent Articles

November 29, 2010

The World is, In Short, Teenaged: Paul Murray’s Skippy Dies 8

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Paul Murray’s Skippy Dies is a soaring ode to teenage dreams, every paradise and nightmare, and far and away the best book I’ve read in years.

November 29, 2010

The New Yorker on the TSA 0

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The New Yorker posts its airport security cartoons, from 1938 to the present.

November 28, 2010

Staff Pick: Millen Brand’s The Outward Room 2

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A quiet little miracle of a book.

November 28, 2010

The Too-Short History of Soft Skull 0

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NY Press has a long look at the history of iconoclastic indie press Soft Skull, which recently shuttered its New York office, effectively ending the publisher’s run as a standalone press and making it just an imprint of California-based parent (and, it should be noted, rescuer from financial straights) Counterpoint. Incidentally, I’ve had a front […]

November 28, 2010

Staff Pick: John Fowles’ The Tree 0

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He takes to task the Victorian obsession with categorizing, with trying to tame the wild, and makes a case for experiencing nature, for “green chaos.”

November 28, 2010

A secret room in a library in India 0

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The Times of India reports on an eerie library mystery: renovations to the 250-year-old National Library in Kolkata have revealed a secret chamber. The sealed 1000 square foot enclosure on the first floor has no windows, trapdoors, or openings of any kind.

November 27, 2010

Gifts for the Bookish 0

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The New Yorker Book Bench has posted its 2010 Holiday Gift Guide.

November 26, 2010

MFA vs. NYC? 0

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At Slate, Chad Harbach weighs in on the MFA.

November 26, 2010

Matt Taibbi’s Class Warfare is Truthy and Depressing 11

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Griftopia portrays America as a ghetto being looted by evil drug lords, but a simpler explanation of the financial crisis, to me at least, seems to be the economics of laziness and arrogance.

November 26, 2010

John Updike, and the Curious Business of Sustaining Literary Reputations 0

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Melville apparently was the deceased writer Updike worried he would become — dead before he‘d died.