Recent Articles

December 6, 2010

A Year in Reading: Lynne Tillman 2

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In reading, the discoveries that count are ones you make for yourself.

December 6, 2010

New TQC 0

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The newest issue of The Quarterly Conversation is up. Eclectic as ever, it features pieces on Yasushi Inoue, Jose Saramago, Stephen Dixon, Thomas Bernhard, and more.

December 6, 2010

The Art of Fiction No. 207: Jonathan Franzen 0

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“I’ve never felt less self-consciously preoccupied with language than I did when I was writing Freedom.” Lorin Stein introduces The Paris Review’s new Winter issue, and includes excerpts from the Art of Fiction interview with Jonathan Franzen.

December 6, 2010

Google Enters the eBookstore Ring 1

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Google took the wraps off its long-awaited ebookstore today. Google ebooks can be bought at Google Books and are also available at Powells and indie bookstore portal IndieBound (both of which are missing out on some serious publicity by not having info about this on their front page today). The ebooks are readable on a […]

December 6, 2010

A Year in Reading: Margaret Atwood 2

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Best to avoid living authors. The others hear about it and think you don’t like them.

December 6, 2010

Donohgue and Cunningham at Symphony Space 0

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In New York? Visit Symphony Space tonight (12/6) at 7:30 PM to see Emma Donoghue in conversation with author Michael Cunningham. Donoghue’s Year in Reading entry appeared here today.

December 6, 2010

Best New Blogs 2

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A fresh take on the year-end list: Bygone Bureau’s Best New Blogs of 2010.

December 6, 2010

A Year in Reading: Emma Donoghue 0

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Gilgamesh stunned me.

December 6, 2010

Literature By The Numbers 0

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The New York Times reports that the titles of every British book published in English in the 19th century  (1,681,161, to be exact) are being electronically scoured for key words and phrases that might offer insight into the Victorian mind.

December 6, 2010

Lynda Barry on the Painted Novel 1

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“I came back to my studio and tried to think of the slowest possible way to write a novel, and the slowest way is with frosting.” The Paris Review interviews cartoonist Lynda Barry about writing novels with a paintbrush.