Recent Articles

November 9, 2009

Innovations in Multi-Tasking 0

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The “Laptop Steering Wheel Desk” seems like a really bad idea. Then again, better that anyone inclined to use a computer while driving have a desk to put it on.

November 9, 2009

Fall 2009 Story Contest 0

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Narrative Magazine announces its Fall 2009 Story Contest, open to fiction and non-fiction writers. Submission deadline November 30th.

November 9, 2009

A Guest in the Shadow Country 6

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Grouping writers according to their countries of origin or of citizenship seems strangely arcane. These just don’t seem like useful divisions, especially in the case of fiction.

November 9, 2009

Claude Levi-Strauss, 1908-2009 2

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Levi-Strauss’ most important ideas would become so ubiquitous that you probably already know them, even if you don’t know you know.

November 8, 2009

FYI: GRH 0

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The editor of the sumptuous Aussie lit-mag Torpedo – a kind of antipodean McSweeney’s – interviews a recent contributor: me (2).

November 7, 2009

Rape-Rape 0

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Jenny Diski‘s personal take on Roman Polanski and rape, at the London Review of Books.

November 7, 2009

Jane Austen in New York 0

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At the Morgan Library in NYC: “A Woman’s Wit: Jane Austen‘s Life and Legacy.” Read the NY Times review of the show here.  And, if your hankering for eighteenth and early nineteenth century English art isn’t sated by the Austen, the Morgan is also offering “William Blake‘s World: ‘A New Heaven Is Begun’”.

November 6, 2009

Sarah Baracuda, In Her Own Words 0

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Sarah Palin‘s memoir, Going Rogue, arrives in bookstores on November 17th; For those who can’t wait, may we suggest The Sarah Palin Rogue Coloring and Activity Book?

November 6, 2009

Coming to a theater near Tokyo 0

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First it was Pebble Beach, and now they want our movies. After years of bad Hollywood remakes of good Japanese movies, turnabout is fair play.

November 6, 2009

A Tipping Point for Gladwell Haters? 1

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The Nation expends about 7,500 words to say Malcolm Gladwell is a hack. The source of the umbrage: “a cheerful, conversational voice deployed in a perfectly paced dopamine prose that had the palliative effect of nullifying whatever concerns readers might have about this product or that problem.”