Recent Articles

March 28, 2014

On Literary Cravings and Aftertastes 2

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I had a voracious appetite to consume certain books I’d read long ago, revisiting passages that had always been especially moving. Or — and this was fun and also eerie in its accuracy — I found myself submitting to cravings for books I had never before read but the combined language, plot, and characters of which turned out to produce the perfect meal of prose for this pregnant bibliophile.

March 27, 2014

Finding Frances 0

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Recommended Reading: Laura Van Prooyen’s poem at The Missouri Review “Location: Frances.” “When I say Frances, I mean a woman. I mean/a place. The dead cling to the land.”

March 27, 2014

Capturing Appalachia 0

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“Of all the work produced from this region no one observer gets the place or the people completely right,” Rob Amberg writes about his 40 years spent photographing Appalachia. His photo essay “Up the Creek” is part of The Oxford American’s “Portraying Appalachia” Symposium.

March 27, 2014

Harper Lee’s Letters 0

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Even though Harper Lee hasn’t given an interview in 50 years, her letters are an insight into the notoriously reclusive writer.”I simply don’t give interviews, because it takes great skill to ask meaningful questions and very few people in the media have it,” she wrote in a 2005 letter. Two of Lee’s letters will be […]

March 27, 2014

Tennessee Williams’s College Days 0

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The Strand Magazine is publishing a previously unseen Tennessee Williams short story in its spring issue. “Crazy Night” is about Williams’s lovelorn college days when he describes sex like “vaccination the first day of school.”

March 27, 2014

The YA Diet 0

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From Hunger Games‘s Katniss to Divergent‘s Tris, today’s YA heroines are confident, intelligent, powerful, and always skinny. At The Atlantic,  Julianne Ross argues that this scrawny stereotype ends up belittling the heroines’ independence and strength. “Just as women are expected to be sexual but not slutty, pure but not prudish, heroines should be strong but […]

March 27, 2014

Filling the Silences: Race, Poetry, and the Digital-Media Megaphone 2

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For most white Americans born outside the South, the Civil Rights Movement is the stuff of history books — fascinating, but abstract. For people like Taylor and myself, whose families were profoundly shaped by the civil rights struggle before we were born, that turbulent era is acutely personal, and at the same time distant and exotic.

March 26, 2014

Flummoxing Florals 0

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With the cold front in America right now, you would never know it’s meant to be spring. To get yourself in the season, take The Guardian’s floral poetry quiz. Sample question: “What reminds Ezra Pound of ‘petals on a wet, black bough’?”

March 26, 2014

The Alice Munroonie 0

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First Alice Munro won the Nobel, and now she has her own commemorative coin. She will be on the Canadian $5 coin, but don’t expect to spend it anytime soon. There will be only 7,500 of the coins, which will sell for $69.95 each.

March 26, 2014

Paper Towns is Coming to Screen 0

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The Fault in Our Stars isn’t even out yet, but John Green already has another adaptation on the way. Fox 2000 will bring Paper Towns to screen next with the same screenwriters and producers as The Fault in Our Stars.  Green will also be producing. “If you don’t like something, you can blame me,” he […]