Recent Articles

December 3, 2014

A Year in Reading: Janet Fitch 0

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I love a book that tears me to shreds — and, on the sentence level, soars to the heavens.

December 3, 2014

“Qualities other than introspection” 0

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Recommended Reading: Adelle Waldman’s answer to the novel’s detractors. (FYI, she’s written for The Millions.)

December 3, 2014

A Year in Reading: Blake Butler 76

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Recently, I have begun reading with my eyes closed.

December 3, 2014

Whowasit 0

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Haven’t read Agatha Christie? The Oyster Review will get you up to speed. Their latest Reader’s Guide, written by Lili Loofbourow, delves into the writer behind Miss Marple, Hercule Poirot and countless other iconic characters. You could also read Daniel Friedman on the ending to every mystery novel.

December 3, 2014

A Year in Reading: Emily Gould 40

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God, this book. This BOOK! I mean, it’s just hard to imagine anyone not loving this book. I think it’s perfect.

December 2, 2014

A Reader’s Book of Days: A Reading List for a Month of Storytelling by the Fire 1

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Did Dickens invent Christmas? It’s sometimes said he did, recreating the holiday as we know it out of the neglect that had been imposed on it by Puritanism, Utilitarianism, and the Scrooge-like forces of the Industrial Revolution.

December 2, 2014

A Year in Reading: Isaac Fitzgerald 1

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As you might expect from a David Mitchell novel, it’s big, ambitious, and pretty.

December 2, 2014

Before They Were Notable: 2014 0

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This year’s New York Times Notable Books of the Year list is out.

December 2, 2014

Edan Lepucki Sells Her Second Novel 0

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Congrats are in order for our own Edan Lepucki, who recently sold her second novel to Crown! Her new book, a “sly, sinister exploration of female relationships,” will come out in 2017. You could also read her and our own Bill Morris on writing their most recent novels.

December 2, 2014

A Year in Reading: Karen Joy Fowler 0

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I suspect that few writers would survive the back-to-back reading of their works as well as Molly Gloss does. Her prose is meticulous, her characters distinct, her plotting unforced, her stories simultaneously iconic and completely natural in tone and incident.