Recent Articles

July 1, 2016

Library Tour 0

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The al-Qarawiyyin library, the oldest library in the world, has just reopened after years of renovations. Take a look inside. Andrew Pippos writes about private libraries and what they reveal about their readers.

July 1, 2016

Crowdsourcing a Book 0

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Important Indiegogo Alert: Kenneth James is editing the personal journals of novelist and critic Samuel R. Delany in a five-volume series. The first volume is complete, and James is asking for a bit of help to complete the second. Neil Gaiman has offered substantial monetary support.

July 1, 2016

Namesakes 0

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Anahi was a princess and political agitator who the Spaniards burned at the stake for being a witch. She accepted her fate honorably; instead of screaming out in pain, she prayed, asking God to save the Guayaki people.

July 1, 2016

Writerly Advice 0

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Maria Popova has compiled famous author’s advice on writing, a perfect resource to pair with Marcia Desanctis‘s essay “There Is No Handbook For Being a Writer”.

July 1, 2016

Songs of Ourselves: Searching for America’s Epic Poem 1

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For all of our tweedy jingoism, the United States seems rare among nations in not having an identifiable and obvious candidate for national epic.

June 30, 2016

Barbie Bodies 0

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Peggy Orenstein, author of Girls and Sex, writes at Mother Jones about “hotness,” commodification, and women’s bodies.

June 30, 2016

Wiesel in Disney 0

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Something to brighten your day — Elie Wiesel visited Disneyland and absolutely loved it.

June 30, 2016

The Arrangements 1

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The New York Times Book Review commissioned a work of fiction about the election from Chimamanda Ngozi Adichie. She chose to write about Melania Trump. If you can handle more Trump, check out Greg Chase’s portrait of a Trump supporter, based on Faulkner’s The Sound and The Fury.

June 30, 2016

Remembering the Present: On Chuck Klosterman’s ‘But What if We’re Wrong?’ 0

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Klosterman’s conversations with Neil deGrasse Tyson and string theorist Brain Greene prove to be fascinating, if creepy, measured discussions of whether life might be a simulation.

June 30, 2016

Political Lit 0

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Patrice Hutton writes on Obama, Marilynne Robinson’s Gilead, and politics at Ploughshares. You could also read Alex Engebretson’s thoughts on Robinson’s singular vision.