Year in Reading

December 18, 2012

A Year in Reading: Malcolm Jones 1

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Featuring the madcap octogenarian party boy and all-around cutup. I pray that I live long enough to follow his errant but shining example.

December 17, 2012

A Year in Reading: Robin Sloan 2

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A 15-year-old memoir is still the best rendering of our new relationship with code that anyone has produced.

December 17, 2012

A Year in Reading: Lars Iyer 0

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It is a work of contemporary wisdom literature, a genre to which no “poor idiot professor” can contribute.

December 17, 2012

A Year in Reading: Alix Ohlin 1

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I don’t think I’ve ever read books so utterly lacking in sentiment, and yet so completely heartbreaking.

December 17, 2012

A Year in Reading: Nichole Bernier 1

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I love a book that beats me up a little, makes the monkey mind sit still and show respect.

December 16, 2012

A Year in Reading: Elizabeth Minkel 1

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It’s the sort of book that turns you into an evangelist, in an almost embarrassing way, like, reaching into your purse to wave a copy in peoples’ faces when someone casually mentions, “I hear you’re writing about cricket?”

December 16, 2012

A Year in Reading: Emily M. Keeler 3

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Some magic thing is transferred from the page to your mind, and room is made for the richness of a new feeling or thought.

December 16, 2012

A Year in Reading: Michael Bourne 0

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Flynn is especially good at creating damaged, dangerous women whose deeply imagined inner lives break your heart even as the characters create havoc in the lives of the people around them.

December 15, 2012

A Year in Reading: Christian Lorentzen 1

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The plot involves a penthouse in a skyscraper, an oil fortune, a motorcycle accident, dancing in bars, taking pills, and having sex outside.

December 15, 2012

A Year in Reading (And Not): Mark O’Connell 1

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I’m always buying books on the basis that they are exactly the books I should be reading, while knowing that the likelihood of my ever starting them, let alone finishing them, is vanishingly small. I have no idea how many works of academic literary criticism I have bought on this basis, but it is, I fear, a number approaching shitloads.