Curiosities

May 11, 2015

More Anxiety 0

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Harold Bloom turns eighty-five this year, which makes it all the more impressive that his forty-fifth book, The Daemon Knows, comes out this week. At Vulture, Amy Bloom (no relation) has tea and scones with the Yale professor, who talks about Emily Dickinson, Walt Whitman and why a critic called his new book “an invectorium.” You […]

May 10, 2015

150 New Mark Twains 0

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Just found: 150 new Mark Twain stories, written when the author was a young newspaperman in San Francisco.

May 10, 2015

Adaptation Progress Report 0

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This week in book-to-film adaptations: Meredith Goldstein rounds up some possible and upcoming projects for The Boston Globe, including adaptations of The Goldfinch (which we cast here) and our own Emily St. John Mandel‘s Station Eleven.

May 9, 2015

McCarthy, Literary Idol 0

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“In addition to fearing, as a young person, that I lacked sophistication, I also feared that I lacked courage. It was hard for me to say something even mildly tough about someone else or their work; hard for me, generally, to be critical. Mary McCarthy had no such trouble.” Meg Wolitzer, author of The Interestings, […]

May 9, 2015

Childhood Reads 0

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The Guardian asked: what childhood reads inspired authors like Margaret Atwood, Sue Townsend and Doris Lessing?

May 8, 2015

Thank Your Mother 0

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Recommended (and timely!) reading: Christy Wampole on why “You Will Never Be Able to Thank Your Mother Enough.”

May 8, 2015

The Future of the Post-Apocalyptic 0

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“Post-apocalyptic books are thriving for a simple reason: The world feels more precariously perched on the lip of the abyss than ever, and facing those fears through fiction helps us deal with it.” A look at the future of post-apocalyptic fiction from NPR, with a mention of our own Emily St. John Mandel‘s Station Eleven.

May 8, 2015

A History of Pen Names 0

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This week in book-related infographics: “A History of Pen Names,” from Robinson Crusoe to Dr. Seuss to Toni Morrison.

May 7, 2015

Write to Win 0

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Want to win a house? A goat farm? A country bed-and-breakfast? Write an essay.

May 7, 2015

An Animated Crime and Punishment 0

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Recommended viewing: Open Culture has tracked down two animated adaptations of Dostoevksy‘s work. There’s one of his short story “The Dream of a Ridiculous Man” “in full-on existentialist mode,” and slightly more ambitious (though dramatically abridged) short film of Crime and Punishment.