Curiosities

February 9, 2015

The Craven 0

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Ralph Waldo Emerson called him “the jingle-man.” Henry James called his work “decidedly primitive.” Yet Edgar Allan Poe, nearly two centuries after his death, is now acclaimed as a writer on par with his best contemporaries. How did his reputation evolve? In the Times Literary Supplement, Marjorie Perloff reviews a new study of Poe by Jerome […]

February 9, 2015

fragment:story 0

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If you know what the phrase “hypertext story” means, you’re likely at least passingly familiar with new media literature, which first appeared all the way back in the days of floppy disks. At Ploughshares, a brief introduction to the genre, with a nod to hypertext ur-teacher and novelist Robert Coover. You could also read Guy […]

February 8, 2015

Introducing Literary Hub 0

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Introducing a new literary site: Electric Literature and Grove Atlantic have combined forces to create Literary Hub, a site that will collect bookish news and articles from around the web.

February 8, 2015

Chekhov, Journalist 0

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Over at the New Yorker, Akhil Sharma argues that “Anton Chekhov’s “Sakhalin Island“, his long investigation of prison conditions in Siberia, is the best work of journalism written in the nineteenth century.” Pair Sharma’s argument, and admiration, with our own Sonya Chung‘s “I Heart Checkov” essay.

February 8, 2015

Love DNA 0

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This week in book-related infographics, and just in time for Valentine’s Day: a look at the “Love DNA of Classic Novels.”

February 7, 2015

Risk-Taker, Miracle-Maker 0

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“Maybe the optimists are right; maybe poetry does help you live your life. And maybe they are more right than they know, and it rounds you out for death.” Andrew O’Hagan writes for The Guardian about falling in love with poetry and coming to see the poet as “a risk-taker, a miracle-maker, a moral panjandrum and […]

February 7, 2015

Reading by Halves 0

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Over at Electric Literature, Lincoln Michel wonders “What’s Wrong with Only Reading Half a Book?” Pair with our own Sonya Chung‘s essay on her list of unfinished reads and the art of “breaking up with books.”

February 7, 2015

“Loving” to Read 0

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“We connect with books in an intellectual way, but the most valuable relationships we have with them are emotional; to say that you merely admire or respect a book is, on some level, to insult it. Feelings are so fundamental to literary life that it can be hard to imagine a way of relating to […]

February 6, 2015

In the Middle 0

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A lot is written about artists just starting their careers, and about those artists with a lifetime of work to look back over, but in a piece for The Enemy Barry Schwabasky considers the difficulty of being somewhere in the middle of an artistic career. After all, “most artists do, for better or worse, live […]

February 6, 2015

Surrealist and Sweet 0

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I’ve written before about Haruki Murakami‘s advice column, but at that point it was still a work-in-progress with few details or samples available. A month later, the submission period for questions is over and Murakami’s responses are being published. The Washington Post calls the column “surrealist and sweet,” and NPR has reported on the ongoing Mr.Murakami’s Place project […]