Reviews Archives - Page 74 of 87 - The Millions

January 14, 2008

A Mexican Interlude: A Review of The Lawless Roads by Graham Greene 3

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This guest contribution comes from Kevin Hartnett. Hartnett lives in Philadelphia with his fiance. After graduating from college in 2003, he joined Teach For America and taught sixth grade in the Bronx for two years. He enjoys politics and travel and writing about both. In early 1938, at the behest of the Vatican, Graham Greene […]

January 13, 2008

Gonzo Got It: A Review of Gonzo by Jann Wenner 1

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After reading the new oral biography of Hunter S. Thompson, Gonzo, by Thompson’s friend and patron, Rolling Stone chief Jann Wenner, and former R.S. writer Corey Seymour, I have come to believe that Thompson deserves his iconic status in the history of American letters. Many will disagree, wondering how in the world a drug addicted, […]

January 3, 2008

Winter Wilderness: A Review of Snow by Orhan Pamuk 2

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This guest contribution comes from Kevin Hartnett. Hartnett lives in Philadelphia with his fiance. After graduating from college in 2003, he joined Teach For America and taught sixth grade in the Bronx for two years. He enjoys politics and travel and writing about both. Snow, Nobel laureate Orhan Pamuk’s 2004 novel, opens as Ka, a […]

December 21, 2007

Charlie Wilson’s Secret Proxy War 1

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Charlie Wilson’s War, the movie, is set to open nationwide on Friday. A recent screening in Manhattan was about two-thirds full, and the response when the lights came up was tepid applause. It’s not a bad movie, basically Tom Hanks wearing suspenders, grab-assing with Julia Roberts, and drinking a lot of scotch. It also features […]

November 28, 2007

Churchill in Fiction: A Review of Never Surrender by Michael Dobbs 0

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Yet another book about World War II may seem like a yawner. Because, seriously, what hasn’t been written about the subject already? With the history side of things well-documented, most new books delve into personal accounts of the war years. In Never Surrender, British author Michael Dobbs does just that, but with a twist. The […]

November 19, 2007

Going Solo: A Review of In The Hot Zone by Kevin Sites 1

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There are about 30 ongoing conflicts in the world. Contrary to conventional wisdom and blissful ignorance, the big wars since World War II have not been limited to Vietnam, the Soviet invasion of Afghanistan, or the current wars endearingly known as Operation Iraqi Freedom and Operation Enduring Freedom – i.e., the Iraq and Afghanistan wars. […]

November 16, 2007

Time in a Bottle: A Review of Gregoire Bouillier’s The Mystery Guest 3

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In a genre dominated by by-the-numbers sagas of suffering and redemption, Gregoire Bouillier’s is a refreshingly odd voice. The bulk of his memoir, The Mystery Guest takes place in the space of a single day – a day in which not much happens. And yet, with its restless intelligence, The Mystery Guest manages to encompass […]

October 22, 2007

The ‘P’ is Free: A Review of Jesse Ball’s Samedi the Deafness 4

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As a term of approbation, “precious” has lost its currency. These days, the p-word puts us in mind less of rare gems than of independent films about quirky white people. But as A.O. Scott’s recent review of The Darjeeling Limited reminds us, we needn’t choose between precious and precious. In the movies of Wes Anderson, […]

October 21, 2007

The Worst Case Scenario: Pastoralia by George Saunders 2

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To read one of George Saunders’ stories is to gain a glimpse into an antic, often frightening, just-slightly-shifted alternative world. To read a George Saunders collection is to discover the human sorrow his stories plumb. Reading Pastoralia was something of a revelation for me because, though I’ve read many of Saunders’ stories before, I had […]

October 15, 2007

Message from a Dead Man: A Review of Denis Johnson’s Tree of Smoke 2

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The intrusion of the university into the life of the writer “is unquestionably the chief sociological fact of modern American literature,” Keith Gessen wrote in last year’s N+1 symposium on American literature. Though Gessen’s rhetoric may have been strategically hyperbolic, the facts bore him out. For better or for worse, the M.F.A. workshop has changed […]