Reviews Archives - Page 74 of 78 - The Millions

April 2, 2006

The Corey Vilhauer Book of the Month Club: April 2006 0

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I had a hell of a time picking my book of the month this time around. This happens every few months, and I’m always better off for the difficulty in choosing my favorite. One month I will go through four books and have a definitive favorite – a book that I’ll recommend to friends, etc. […]

March 7, 2006

Bonds Bombshell 1

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Wow. Sports Illustrated has just published an excerpt of Game of Shadows by SF Chronicle reporters Mark Fainaru-Wada and Lance Williams that lays out what can only be described as incontrovertible evidence that Barry Bonds has been a rampant steroid user for the last several years. This is going to rock the baseball world, and […]

March 3, 2006

The Corey Vilhauer Book of the Month Club: March 2006 0

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With my personal sport of choice – professional basketball – surging towards the playoffs, I felt a need to read about sports. I needed to read about jocks and sweat and champions and the like. Instead, I read about gambling. And politics. Oh, and a little bit of about sports. (First, though, an aside. I […]

February 8, 2006

I Never Liked You by Chester Brown: A Review 0

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I have read only a very few graphic novels, but the ones I have read all seem to tread the same emotional ground. Chris Ware’s Jimmy Corrigan, Daniel Clowes’ Ghost World and now I Never Liked You by Chester Brown. Their stories center on a sort of teenage emptiness that inspires a combination of pity […]

February 8, 2006

The Soul of a New Machine by Tracy Kidder: A Review 1

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The “Machine” in the title of Tracy Kidder’s Pulitzer Prize-winning book from 1982 is a minicomputer, but for anyone reading it now, it might as well be a time machine. The Soul of a New Machine takes the reader back 27 years, but in terms of the technology that is central to the book, it […]

February 3, 2006

The Corey Vilhauer Book of the Month Club: February 2006 0

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One of the most harrowing things about reading is having to finish a book in order to start another. It’s a necessary evil, to use a cliche, because in order to start a book we have already perceived as being worthy of reading we must first finish the one we are currently on. Bittersweet is […]

February 2, 2006

Dark Star Safari by Paul Theroux: A Review 0

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Though I’ve heard great things about Paul Theroux, Dark Star Safari was the first by him that I’ve read – well, listened to actually. Thanks to our current location in Chicago and the locations of our respective families, the holidays involve a lot of driving for Mrs. Millions and me – 36 hours worth this […]

January 30, 2006

Seize the Day by Saul Bellow: A Review 0

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I love finding old pocket paperbacks in thrift stores. That’s how I ended up with a 1960s-era British pocket Penguin edition of Saul Bellow’s Seize the Day. On the cover, the price is listed as “3’6” which, though I’ve been to England, I can’t decipher. On the first page, in pencil is the price – […]

January 23, 2006

Wade Rubenstein’s Gullboy: A Review 1

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It’s a balancing act. How do you express yourself within a rich tradition without resorting to cliche? The deeper you go into the tradition, into the familiar, the more blindingly original your own expression really needs to be. Take, for example, the songs of Will Oldham. A staggeringly good songwriter, his understated records resonate long […]

January 23, 2006

The White Earth by Andrew McGahan: A Review 0

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Andrew McGahan’s The White Earth was a big deal when it came out in Australia in 2004. His previous novels had given him a following, but The White Earth was the winner of the Miles Franklin Prize, Australia’s richest literary award, catapulting him to a new level of recognition. The book is a multigenerational tale […]