Reviews Archives - Page 5 of 86 - The Millions

October 11, 2016

Perfectly Delectable: Marcy Dermansky’s ‘The Red Car’ 0

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If a story of a woman going west to find herself doesn’t sound original, it’s Dermansky’s delivery that makes this short novel perfectly delectable.

October 11, 2016

To Open Borders: ‘Him, Me, Muhammad Ali’ 0

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If you haven’t read Randa Jarrar, it’s time to.

September 30, 2016

Black and Proud: James McBride on James Brown 1

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James McBride’s ‘Kill ‘Em and Leave’ is a scorchingly honest examination of the racial divide that explains why America continues to be a bloody and schizophrenic place.

September 29, 2016

A Danger to Others: On Teddy Wayne’s ‘Loner’ 5

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Loner is not about bullying’s bloody aftermath, or how Mental Health Services can do more to thwart shootings on school campuses. It’s about men — in particular, white men of privilege — feeling entitled to women’s bodies.

September 28, 2016

Renegade Political Fiction: ‘The Revolutionaries Try Again’ 1

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Economic, political and social violence are senseless, and render us unable to tell neat linear narratives about injustice and protest.

September 19, 2016

Loving That Wild Thing: Leigh Stein’s ‘Land of Enchantment’ 1

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He’s the guy with the electric eyes and unkempt hair. The guy with the daddy issues and the temper and the drug problem. We are the good girls. We don’t drink or make trouble. We come from good families. So why do we need to tame that wild thing?

September 15, 2016

Humanity’s Dogged Endurance: On Alexander Weinstein’s ‘Children of the New World’ 1

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Weinstein seems to say that while we can make startling advances in Internet porn, we cannot clean up the mess we’ve made of our environment—but that pessimism is deceptive.

September 15, 2016

The Intimately Epic Poem We Need: On ‘IRL’ by Tommy Pico 0

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The digitized, the pop culture, the intimate, the political, and the literary all bleed together, revealing the connective tissue of language that often is as confusing as it is humorous.

September 14, 2016

The Body Doesn’t Lie: On Ian McEwan’s ‘Nutshell’ 4

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McEwan, this once at least, has decided to shuffle off the mortal coil of realism in favor of an impossible point of view.

September 13, 2016

Throwing Out the Instruction Manual: On Alexandra Kleeman’s ‘Intimations’ 12

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Kleeman is working in the surrealism-neighboring-naturalism tradition of preceding wunderkinds like Téa Obreht and Jonathan Safran Foer, where sections of dreamlike allegory supplement sections telling the primary “real life” story.