Reviews Archives - Page 4 of 80 - The Millions

May 17, 2016

He Doesn’t Wear a Game Face: On David Foster Wallace’s ‘String Theory’ 5

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The sense one gets reading these pieces is of a discovery process, the author stumbling sentence-by-sentence toward understanding — a task to which he wholly devotes his profane, fucked-up, intellectually omnivorous self.

May 12, 2016

It Gets into Your Bones: On Kate Tempest’s ‘The Bricks That Built the Houses’ 0

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Working hard, going to college, saving money — in the old days, before the arrival of the moneyed class, these things were believed to guarantee a secure future. Now, they might not even lead to secure employment.

May 10, 2016

Here’s to the Cowardly Ones: On Dmitri Shostakovich and Emotional Rebellion 11

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If Shostakovich succumbed to power, it was in an effort to leave the world with beauty that cannot be marred by power.

May 9, 2016

Die a Million People: On ‘The Colonel Who Would Not Repent’ 7

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Salil Tripathi’s book serves as a primer to the current crisis — including the extremists’ slaying of foreigners, non-Muslims, and writers that has begun since the book’s completion.

May 9, 2016

The Revolution Has Been Televised: On Big Sports and Big Money 0

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In 1966, baseball’s reserve clause that bound a player to one team meant that the average major league player’s salary was $14,000. Topps paid each exactly $125 to put them on a bubble-gum card.

May 6, 2016

Upscale, Artisanal Bullshit of the Highest Order 12

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My experience reading Gone with the Mind spawned an array of adjectives, often in the span of a few seconds. Absurd, juvenile, sophisticated, selfless, masturbatory, profound. That’s Mark Leyner, and he knows it.

May 6, 2016

Ward Farnsworth Doesn’t Mess Around: On ‘Classical English Metaphor’ 1

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For those who venture into Farnsworth’s level-headed take on murky abstractions, the benefits will be less far-reaching, less comprehensively employable, but they will also be richer, longer-lasting, and as demystifying and powerful as the strongest metaphors.

May 4, 2016

The End of the Self Is the End of the Universe 4

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Sadness might seem too sincere an emotion to ascribe to a novel written by a postmodernist, but Zero K pushes its readers to feel.

May 3, 2016

Two Women, Two Lives, Two Stories: Together, but Brutally Alone 0

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With Eleven Hours, Erens continues interrogating the core contradiction that threads through two earlier novels: The simultaneity of twinness and aloneness.

May 3, 2016

Portrait of the Artist as a Young Woman 0

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The shifting landscapes are the first of many disorientations that Wood sets up for his reader in this haunting narrative.