Reviews Archives - Page 3 of 79 - The Millions

May 9, 2016

Die a Million People: On ‘The Colonel Who Would Not Repent’ 7

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Salil Tripathi’s book serves as a primer to the current crisis — including the extremists’ slaying of foreigners, non-Muslims, and writers that has begun since the book’s completion.

May 9, 2016

The Revolution Has Been Televised: On Big Sports and Big Money 0

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In 1966, baseball’s reserve clause that bound a player to one team meant that the average major league player’s salary was $14,000. Topps paid each exactly $125 to put them on a bubble-gum card.

May 6, 2016

Upscale, Artisanal Bullshit of the Highest Order 12

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My experience reading Gone with the Mind spawned an array of adjectives, often in the span of a few seconds. Absurd, juvenile, sophisticated, selfless, masturbatory, profound. That’s Mark Leyner, and he knows it.

May 6, 2016

Ward Farnsworth Doesn’t Mess Around: On ‘Classical English Metaphor’ 1

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For those who venture into Farnsworth’s level-headed take on murky abstractions, the benefits will be less far-reaching, less comprehensively employable, but they will also be richer, longer-lasting, and as demystifying and powerful as the strongest metaphors.

May 4, 2016

The End of the Self Is the End of the Universe 4

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Sadness might seem too sincere an emotion to ascribe to a novel written by a postmodernist, but Zero K pushes its readers to feel.

May 3, 2016

Two Women, Two Lives, Two Stories: Together, but Brutally Alone 0

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With Eleven Hours, Erens continues interrogating the core contradiction that threads through two earlier novels: The simultaneity of twinness and aloneness.

May 3, 2016

Portrait of the Artist as a Young Woman 0

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The shifting landscapes are the first of many disorientations that Wood sets up for his reader in this haunting narrative.

April 20, 2016

In the Middle of the Forever War 18

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Collect the dead. Tend the wounded. Gather evidence. Hunt. Remember.

April 15, 2016

Black Berets Unite: In Praise of Pretentiousness 25

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A partial list of things labeled pretentious in my home town: indie rock, foreign films, mobile phones, vegetarian diets, keeping one’s maiden name, carrying bottled water, wearing all black, drinking wine, reading The New York Times, dressing androgynously, taking self-portraits, drinking Starbucks, practicing yoga.

April 13, 2016

Lurid Tales of Crime and Aristocratic Extravagance 1

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The primary pleasure in Making Monte Carlo comes from watching the various eccentrics, lowlifes, high-rollers, and famous artists — Edvard Munch, Karl Marx, F. Scott Fitzgerald, Coco Chanel — stroll in to take a seat at the table.