Lists

January 4, 2011

New Yorker Fiction By the Numbers 8

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Several years ago I started cataloging the fiction published in The New Yorker in a spreadsheet. The spreadsheet began merely as a way to keep track of what I’d read, but I soon became curious about what the spreadsheet’s data-sorting capabilities could reveal.

January 3, 2011

Most Anticipated: The Great 2011 Book Preview 61

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8,000 words strong and encompassing 76 titles, it’s the only 2011 book preview you will ever need.

December 24, 2010

A Special Note for All You New Kindle (And Other Ereader) Owners 7

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For all those readers unwrapping shiny new devices, here are some links to get you going.

November 25, 2010

The Notables: 2010 0

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This year’s New York Times Notable Books of the Year list is out. Sticking with the fiction exclusively, it appears that we touched upon a few of these books as well.

November 15, 2010

The Bolaño Syllabus, Updated 6

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With a new title appearing practically every quarter, where should a Bolañophile turn first?

October 20, 2010

Winners, Declared: A Take on The New Yorker’s 20 Under 40 by One Under 40 3

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In which the author, now that the entire series has been published, addresses The New Yorker’s “20 under 40,” by refining it down to an even thinner and more rarified number.  Is this possible, the reader may ask—or prudent?

October 4, 2010

The View From Germany 9

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On the eve of the Frankfurt Book Fair, it’s striking evidence of a literary trade imbalance that so many American books should be prominent in German buchhandlungs when so few German writers are available in English at all.

September 7, 2010

Celebrity Book Club: A List to End All Lists 41

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Yes, Chuck Norris is a novelist. Life has lost all sense and meaning.

August 20, 2010

Mr. Rochester is a Creep: A List 47

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Charlotte and Emily Brontё were deeply weird, and they (or, okay, their protagonists) were into some deeply weird men.

August 16, 2010

The Franzen Cover and a Brief History of Time 17

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A look at Time‘s 83 literary coverboys and -girls reveals a waffling between reaching out and selling out that, today, we’d describe as Franzean.