Essays Archives - Page 82 of 102 - The Millions

July 13, 2010

A Chiefest Pleasure: Discovering The Sot-Weed Factor on its 50th Birthday 6

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The deeper you go into your life and your reading, the more precious the long-overlooked gems become once you finally unearth them.

July 9, 2010

Literature is a Manner of Completing Ourselves: A Reader’s Year 17

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If I were an addict, I would get high and while high, presumably, worry about where I was to get my next fix. Reading is not all that different, I think. As a reader, I am always looking over the binding thinking about the next read, in some instances, longing for it. Some books, like some highs, are better than others. But even with not-so-good books, I will come back to the drug, seeking the next high.

July 5, 2010

Between the Pages 10

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Being a reader is like playing tricks with time. You turn the page of the fictional story while an hour of your own passes. The characters breathe, laugh and cry, and so do you. When you finish their tale, you close the book and set it aside, dreaming of their ever-after, while stepping out into yours.

July 2, 2010

Oil Plumes and White Noise: On Rereading DeLillo 1

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We are in a situation similar to the one Delillo lays out in White Noise: things are bad, danger is lurking, but we don’t know its full extent. Our exposure has been consummate, and fatal for the health and economic stability of many, but the final tally is not yet in.

June 23, 2010

The City & The City & The City 13

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I read China Miéville’s The City & The City recently. I’ve been thinking lately about the ways in which our cities are layered, the way different versions of a given city exist as shadows of one another, and coming across a story wherein the layering was so explicit delighted me.

June 22, 2010

The Elusive Omniscient 10

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What seems key about the novel is that what we think of as a historical evolution—or a descent from a unified to a fragmented perspective—isn’t an evolution at all. In fact, the novel has always been insecure. It’s just that the manifestation of its insecurity has changed over time.

June 21, 2010

My Grandmother, the Chinese Censor 14

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My grandmother is ninety-two and the cherished matriarch of my family, but even before she learned that my novel was set in her homeland, before she knew anything about it other than that I was writing it, calling her had become an ordeal. Her idea of conversation is what most consider interrogation.

June 11, 2010

The Happy Ghost 13

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Ghostwriting used to be book publishing’s dirty little secret. No more. Today a growing cadre of writers are discovering that checking their ego at the door and telling someone else’s story can make them very successful, very rich and, in at least one case, as close to happy as most writers will ever get.

June 9, 2010

The Trick of It 4

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Childhood and adolescence are the great gateway experiences to adulthood, middle-age, the so-called golden years, and then decrepitude. All that, waiting to be unpacked. By that time it’s too big for a backpack. We’re talking about a whole civilization you’ve buried in your backyard.

June 8, 2010

Climbing a Tree, Uncovering a Duck: Writers on Writing 13

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I’ve always sought out writing metaphors and similes because they articulate the strangeness, joy, and frustrations of such an abstract activity, one that requires you to dream and to focus at the same time.