Essays

September 17, 2008

The Travelers Get Their Bearings 1

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I’m back from my trip to Greece and Turkey. We landed on Saturday night, and I’ve only just recently had a few moments to reflect on where we went and what we saw. (And thanks very much to The Millions contributors for taking care of The Millions while I was gone. It was a treat […]

September 10, 2008

Reading Andre Dubus in Iowa 2

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This guest post comes to us from Sana Krasikov. Krasikov is a graduate of the Iowa Writers’ Workshop and the author of the debut short story collection, One More Year, which the New York Times calls, “a sensitive book about the economics of relationships: how they can become subtle transactions by people trying to pull […]

August 30, 2008

David Brooks and the BoBo Shuffle 2

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Yesterday, as Emily was writing her response to David Brooks’ most recent New York Times column, I was stewing about exactly the same topic. I had been similarly inspired a few months back, when Kevin wrote on the rise of pop-intellecutalism, but had found myself too enervated to complete a post. Now, spurred by Emily’s […]

August 20, 2008

We don’t live in Rabbit Angstrom’s world anymore, though maybe we wish we did 1

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The early years of this century have inspired an uncommon amount of speculation about America’s advancing age. The Olympic Opening Ceremony in Beijing, and the ensuing changing-of-the-guard buzz it inspired, was only the latest, and most pointed, example of the creeping feeling that America, while hardly a senior citizen, might be past its prime. The […]

August 6, 2008

Happy Belated Birthday James Baldwin (August 2, 1924 – November 30, 1987) 0

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Buzz Poole, the managing editor of Mark Batty Publisher, has written for numerous publications, and is an infrequent contributor to The Millions. Keep up with him and his adventures in surprising iconography at the Madonna of the Toast blog. The first time I encountered James Baldwin, when I read Another Country, his work resonated immediately. […]

July 28, 2008

The Quarterly Conversation Gets A New Look 1

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The guest post comes to us from Scott Esposito. Scott is the editor of The Quarterly Conversation and the host of the literary blog Conversational Reading. His writing on books has appeared in the San Francisco Chronicle, The Philadelphia Inquirer, The Chattahoochee Review, and the Rain Taxi Review of Books, among others. The day a […]

July 27, 2008

A Scattering of Feeds 9

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I don’t know that anything has changed the way I consume information more than the discovery of online feed readers about four years ago. I went from skipping through a handful of sites or relying on someone else’s ability to aggregate information to my own personalized and furiously flowing river of news. For an information […]

July 24, 2008

Adventures in Research 0

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Or, “About A Hedge-Whore Beggar-Woman Pretending to be Sick With Saint Fiacre’s Disease, And A Long Thick Gut Made By Trickery Came Out of Her Bum” There are times when research unearths something so unsurpassingly strange that it must be shared. Such is the case of the “Hedge-Whore.” And she is hardly the only treat […]

July 6, 2008

The Manchurian Legacy 6

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The New York Times ran an interesting article last week on the origins of the interrogation techniques used at Guantanamo Bay. The article claims that methods for questioning prisoners at the facility were directly adapted from those used by the Communist Chinese to torture and indoctrinate American soldiers during the Korean War. At the time, […]

June 27, 2008

Pleasures and Disturbances: Reading Abroad 2

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This guest post comes to us from Joan Silber. Joan Silber’s most recent book is the novel, The Size of the World, described as “magnificent fiction” by Publishers’ Weekly. She is the author of Ideas of Heaven, Finalist for the National Book Award and the Story Prize, and four other works of fiction, including Household […]