Essays Archives - Page 50 of 87 - The Millions

January 20, 2012

HBO (Isn’t) Filming The Corrections at My Parents’ House: TV and Fiction 16

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She cut me off and asked whether she should call HBO. She added that they offered anywhere between $1,000 and $3,000 for every day they were filming. My response was something along the lines of: “YOU HAVE TO TELL THEM THAT YOU WILL DO WHATEVER IT TAKES TO FILM THIS SHOW IN OUR HOUSE.”

January 18, 2012

Escapism for Moms: Three Chronicles of Fatherhood 6

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I found myself cheering these elusive mothers: Let her work! Let her sleep! Let her leave town! Some of my fondest feelings toward my daughter, I must admit, rise up in me when I imagine her at home with her dad.

January 11, 2012

My Hour of the Star: On Clarice Lispector 5

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Whether through direct address or the urban intensity and flat out strangeness of the prose, the reader cannot lurk behind the book’s spine, but rather is constantly called upon.

January 10, 2012

Writing the City 6

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They say fiction requires conflict; well, when New York was a war of all against all, you had all the conflict you could handle any time you put your feet on the street.

January 9, 2012

The Story Behind the Story: An Appreciation of Authors’ Acknowledgments 18

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At their best, acknowledgements can be finely-wrought short stories with the author as protagonist. At least one acknowledgements has made me cry.

January 5, 2012

The Politics of Art: Middle Eastern Women in Fiction and Film 4

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We often receive depictions of Middle Eastern women as submissive and helpless, forced to hide their bodies, and we hardly ever discuss their determination as individuals.

November 30, 2011

Naples and The Gallery 2

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John Horne Burns’ The Gallery was his first book, a chronicle of the chaos and beauty and horror of occupied Naples in 1943 and 1944. It’s an interesting hybrid: a novel in which stories alternate with an elegant travelogue, and the travelogue appears to be the author’s memoir: “I remember that at Casablanca it dawned on me that maybe I’d come overseas to die.”

November 30, 2011

The Saddest Story I Have Ever Heard: An Agnostic Appreciation of The Book of Genesis 6

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When I think of poor Adam and Eve and their hapless abdication of paradise in return for some new knowledge, I can’t help thinking of my own incremental sense of impending banishment with each new rumor overheard, as a child, from across the border of Adulthood.

November 28, 2011

The Little Room of Danger and Depth 12

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In this day and age it seems almost prehistoric to want to establish a library. It’s as though I’m admitting that I’ve become a fan of riding a donkey down to the shops, or that I’ve discovered how and why things fall to the ground.

November 28, 2011

Where Have All the Catholic Writers Gone? 63

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Despite such a rich literary heritage, novels — both by Catholics and non-Catholics — grappling with what used to be called “the drama of salvation” are no longer just rare, but almost unthinkable nowadays.