Essays

August 5, 2014

The Art of Close Writing 9

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Close writing really is an amazing thing. Consider that this essay right now has been narrated in the third person, and yet there is no question as to what Clark’s opinions are.

August 4, 2014

Extinction Stories: The Ecological True-Crime Genre 1

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We are living in the midst of the worst die-off since the dinosaurs fell victim to an asteroid 65 million years ago. Whatever the proximal causes, human beings are the asteroids this time.

July 31, 2014

The Academy of Rambling-On: On Bohumil Hrabal’s Fiction 0

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Read the stories. Read the novels. Just read Hrabal.

July 25, 2014

Italo Calvino’s Science Fiction Masterpiece 7

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Cosmicomics is that rarity among progressive texts: its premises are absurd and almost incoherent, yet the plot lines are filled with romance, drama, and conflicts that draw the readers deeper and deeper into the text.

July 24, 2014

New Edition, Old Problems: On Hemingway’s The Sun Also Rises 21

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My first response to the new edition was to wonder whether it was an attempt to steer readers away from the unsavory aspects of the novel, a trigger warning-age sanding down of edges.

July 17, 2014

A Vanished World of Readers: On Joanna Rakoff’s My Salinger Year 0

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A less-heralded casualty of the digital age is the disintegration of the lower rungs of the ladder that have long led young, smart readers into the caste of professional tastemakers.

July 15, 2014

A Degree in Books 8

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This is what college should be like — all shade, dusty books, and lofty conversation.

July 14, 2014

Edan Lepucki and Bill Morris on the Road to Publication 6

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“Four titles, four agents, at least a dozen drafts, and more rejections than I care to count…”

July 8, 2014

The Art of the Opening Sentence 22

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Opening sentences are not to be written lightly.

June 30, 2014

Mystery and Manners: On Teaching Flannery O’Connor 8

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The sheer originality of Flannery O’Connor’s stories shows students how amplifying their surrounding world can make great fiction. Now, 50 years after her death, when she is a staple of syllabi and the very canon that previously excluded her and other women, it is most important to stress fresh approaches to her work within the classroom.