Essays Archives - Page 19 of 107 - The Millions

June 8, 2016

The Psychiatrist’s Assistant: A Brief Anecdotal Study in Hierarchies 1

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As it happened, the doctor had her own creative pursuits on the side: a short story collection that she was paying to have printed by what was known, in literary circles and beyond, as a vanity press.

June 8, 2016

Books I Wish I Wrote: On Writerly Jealousy 7

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I’m jealous of every writer who’s written a feature for The Atlantic and of every Paris memoir that’s ever been published, especially the ones that involve a lot of food. I am full of unthinkable jealousies.

June 6, 2016

Where Legless Men Run and Water Burns: On Lewis Carroll’s Wonderland 0

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Unlike J.M. Barrie or A.A. Milne, Lewis Carroll grants no asylum to wistful acknowledgements that childhood must come to an end. The lost laughter of childhood needn’t be lost forever.

June 1, 2016

Angels of the North: On ‘Happy Valley’ and Anne Brontë 3

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The Victorian Angel in the House hasn’t died; she has mutated from the quiet, calm keeper of domestic bliss into someone huge and ferocious, working at all costs to keep others safe.

May 31, 2016

Johann Wolfgang von Goethe, Amateur Auction Theorist 2

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Hermann and Dorothea went on to be a bestseller, earning tens of thousands of talers, but nary a penny more for poor Goethe.

May 26, 2016

Team Ladislaw: What Henry James (and Everyone Else) Gets Wrong About Middlemarch 2

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If we take Ladislaw and Dorothea’s storyline on good faith, we must confront a terrifying truth — that it is often the heart that defies our best plotting.

May 25, 2016

Instead of a Review: On Reading Diana Athill 0

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I fell in love with Diana Athill in the bath, which is unusual for me because I’m more of a shower person.

May 20, 2016

Nothing Works Until It Works: On Writerly Discomfort 0

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Discomfort, discord, imbalance, conflict — however you want to describe it, this liminality is the spark that lights the creative fire.

May 18, 2016

No Genre Ever Dies: On Loren D. Estleman and the Pulp Tradition 2

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I think Estleman would proud of being described as a throwback to an earlier era, when writers wrote prolifically and never failed to entertain. It’s not haute cuisine — it’s red meat, the stuff you can’t put down until your plate is clean.

May 16, 2016

Justifying Our Existence: The Antioch Review and the Transgender ‘Debate’ 38

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If you really believe that transgender people fail at their genders and you make it a business to say so publicly, you should know that your words resonate far off the page. If your supposed concern for transgender people masks plain old misogyny, then you are complicit in violence.