Staff Picks

November 29, 2012

A Younger, Stranger America: On Harry Houdini’s The Right Way to Do Wrong 0

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The collection functions as a glimpse into a fascinating world of low-rent, high-risk stunt performing that’s largely faded away.

October 29, 2012

Staff Pick: The New Jim Crow 4

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Thanks in large part to the drug war, more than 2 million people, disproportionate numbers of them black and Hispanic, are locked up in America’s prisons, giving us an incarceration rate of 750 per 100,000 people, higher than in Russia, China or Iran.

October 18, 2012

Back in the USSR: On Maurice DeKobra’s The Madonna of the Sleeping Cars 0

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This is the kind of book that gets described as “a delightful romp” in press materials, and that’s not an inaccurate description of a book that functions beautifully as both send-up of high society and globe-spanning adventure story, but the novel has a deathly serious core.

October 4, 2012

Susanna Moore, Cheryl Strayed, and the Place Where the Writers Work 8

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What matters is good writing, what matters is that there are people who love books enough to press them into your hands in far-off cities. We are here for the books, but I think it’s easy to get distracted by our longing for success and forget this.

August 20, 2012

A Book for the Dog Days of Summer 2

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As Murphy and Wasik stress again and again, this is a horrible disease; its grotesque symptoms, its uncurable-ness, its unpredictable incubation time, and its ideal vector–the dog–give it a unique place in the human psyche.

July 31, 2012

Staff Pick: Saul Bellow’s The Bellarosa Connection 2

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Do the ones who save us owe us anything? The Bellarosa Connection is fascinating as a study of memory and regret.

May 31, 2012

The Mad Music of Kevin Barry’s City of Bohane 9

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Thank you, Kevin Barry, for reminding us that the people in the book business are not all idiots simply because they remain locked in slavish pursuit of The Next Hot Young Thing.

May 10, 2012

Staff Pick: H.H. Munro’s The Best of Saki 8

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H.H. Munro wrote a great many light and often very funny send-ups of the stifling conventions and manners of the Edwardian age. But on the other hand, three of the first eight stories in the book involve corpses, with two of these being small children eaten by wild animals.

April 27, 2012

Adventures in Self-Publishing: Dallas Hudgens’ Wake Up, We’re Here 9

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Hudgens doesn’t shy away from the brutality of life on earth — the illness, the decreptitude, the humiliations and the teen suicides — but the grittiness is never gratuitous, and his stories are infused with compassion and humanity.

April 18, 2012

Getting the Good Stuff: Mark Haskell Smith’s Heart of Dankness 6

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Take it from a guy who hates reggae: I highly recommend picking up Heart of Dankness, whether you have a doctor’s recommendation or not.