Curiosities

May 17, 2015

I Heart Antosha Chekhonte 0

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This summer Antosha Chekhonte’s (aka Anton Chekhov‘s) first book The Prank will finally be published after more than 130 years of waiting, and it’s been described as “frankly indispensable for readers of Chekhov, or Russian literature, or comedic literature, or parody, or any and all literature” generally. Pair with our own Sonya Chung‘s essay, “I Heart Chekhov.”

May 17, 2015

Nothing Has to Be Blown Up 0

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“One of the joys of literature is that we can always push back against established ways of speaking and seeing—and nothing has to be blown up.” Mark Z. Danielewski, whose latest novel, the first installment of a 27-book series called The Familiar, has just been released, writes for The Atlantic‘s “By Heart” series about “signiconic” writing, the orneriness of […]

May 16, 2015

An Animated Dalloway 0

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This week marked the 90th anniversary of Mrs. Dalloway‘s publication. Over at The Paris Review, Sadie Stein posted an animated adaptation of the novel, which she describes as “either the worst or the best… depending upon how highly you value things like coherence, tone, and style.”

May 15, 2015

Joy & Wonder & Goshawks 0

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“Joy and wonder. That’s at the heart of what I love about the natural world. If you’re receptive to it, it does something to human minds that nothing else can do.” Electric Literature talks with Helen MacDonald about living with, and like, a goshawk. Pair with Madeleine Larue‘s Millions review of MacDonald’s H is for Hawk.

May 15, 2015

How To: Invent a Language 0

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Think your novel could use a language of its own, but don’t have the philological powers of Tolkien? Then take a few lessons from Game of Throne‘s resident linguist, David J. Peterson, who turned George R.R. Martin‘s 55 Dothraki names into a 4,000 word vocabulary with a working grammar.

May 15, 2015

Discussing Knausgaard 0

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“Knausgaard‘s work is literary because of what it does, but not because of how it’s written. He gets us all asking…where does my truth really lie?” Recommended listening: James Wood, Meghan O’Rourke and Bill Pierce discuss Knausgaard in a podcast for Open Source.

May 14, 2015

A Reader’s Manifesto 0

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This week in book-related comics: “A Reader’s Manifesto” by Grant Snider, via Electric Literature.

May 14, 2015

On The Notebook 0

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“The notebook is where our interior world makes contact with our exterior world; where our instinct for creation is first made material. Our notebooks are our first messy attempts at self-expression, and the ways in which we express ourselves are changing every day.” Sarah Gerard explores the life of the notebook in an essay for […]

May 14, 2015

A Kindle Inheritance 0

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Recommended reading: Nick Bilton on inheriting his mother’s library and the essential difference between print and digital books.

May 13, 2015

Colonized 0

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A Canadian Ph.D. student wrote (and successfully defended!) a 52,000 word dissertation that features almost no punctuation. Titled “Indigenous Architecture through Indigenous Knowledge,” the dissertation has no periods, commas or semi-colons, a choice intended to “make a point” about colonial and aboriginal identity. Canada’s National Post has the story.