Curiosities Archives - Page 3 of 988 - The Millions

June 23, 2016

Elena Ferrante Revealed 0

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Elena Ferrante has revealed her true identity. At McSweeney’s. You could also read this piece on Ferrante’s “encompassing vision of human experience.”

June 23, 2016

Fighting Words 0

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At WBUR’s Modern Love podcast, actress Alysia Reiner (Orange Is The New Black, How To Get Away With Murder) reads author Laura Munson’s essay “Those Aren’t Fighting Words, Dear” from her memoir This Is Not The Story You Think It Is.

June 23, 2016

Titling Publishers 0

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How did Random House get its name? A joke. Book Riot gives the stories behind eleven publishers’ names. You could also read a piece on how writers title their novels.

June 23, 2016

B&N or Bust 0

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We need Barnes & Noble. Alex Shephard writes on the role of the retailer for publishers and readers. You could also check out our series on the Future of the Book.

June 23, 2016

Family Language 0

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Our own Bruna Dantas Lobato reflects on her position living between languages. “I learned English out of necessity and that comes with its own problems—aesthetic and political ones. With childhood in one language and a writing life in the other, I’m standing both inside and outside my mother tongue and my stepmother tongue.” Pair with […]

June 22, 2016

Writing Is a Dangerous Pursuit 0

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“We might not win. And yet we have to commit ourselves to the struggle, because there’s nothing else besides struggle.” Toni Morrison talks about literature and activism with Ta-Nehisi Coates and Sonia Sanchez.

June 22, 2016

Food for the Hungry 0

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Recommended Reading: On the implications of “devouring” literature.

June 22, 2016

Beginner’s Luck 0

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“Our great poet forever has one foot on Mount Parnassus and the other in the rue Quincampoix,” the Wall Street of eighteenth-century Paris. On how Voltaire outsmarted one of the earliest lotteries and made a fortune. Also check out how Goethe became an amateur auction theorist.

June 22, 2016

Remembering Gregory Rabassa 0

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Gregory Rabassa, literary translator and professor at Queens College, died this past week. Rabassa helped introduce Gabriel García Márquez’s One Hundred Years of Solitude and Julio Cortázar’s Hopscotch, among others, to English-language readers. He was 94 years old.

June 22, 2016

Here to Stay 0

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Over at Flavorwire, Jonathon Sturgeon responds to Jeff Guo’s recent article on the end of the period. As he puts it, “Any long piece without periods — is like a car without brakes. You can drive it, but you’d rather not.”