Curiosities

February 8, 2015

Love DNA 0

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This week in book-related infographics, and just in time for Valentine’s Day: a look at the “Love DNA of Classic Novels.”

February 7, 2015

Risk-Taker, Miracle-Maker 0

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“Maybe the optimists are right; maybe poetry does help you live your life. And maybe they are more right than they know, and it rounds you out for death.” Andrew O’Hagan writes for The Guardian about falling in love with poetry and coming to see the poet as “a risk-taker, a miracle-maker, a moral panjandrum and […]

February 7, 2015

Reading by Halves 0

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Over at Electric Literature, Lincoln Michel wonders “What’s Wrong with Only Reading Half a Book?” Pair with our own Sonya Chung‘s essay on her list of unfinished reads and the art of “breaking up with books.”

February 7, 2015

“Loving” to Read 0

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“We connect with books in an intellectual way, but the most valuable relationships we have with them are emotional; to say that you merely admire or respect a book is, on some level, to insult it. Feelings are so fundamental to literary life that it can be hard to imagine a way of relating to […]

February 6, 2015

In the Middle 0

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A lot is written about artists just starting their careers, and about those artists with a lifetime of work to look back over, but in a piece for The Enemy Barry Schwabasky considers the difficulty of being somewhere in the middle of an artistic career. After all, “most artists do, for better or worse, live […]

February 6, 2015

Surrealist and Sweet 0

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I’ve written before about Haruki Murakami‘s advice column, but at that point it was still a work-in-progress with few details or samples available. A month later, the submission period for questions is over and Murakami’s responses are being published. The Washington Post calls the column “surrealist and sweet,” and NPR has reported on the ongoing Mr.Murakami’s Place project […]

February 6, 2015

The Two Philip Roths 0

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“As time passed, I realized the Philip Roth I’d known before the two documentaries we ended up doing was in the process of transformation. The Roth I’d known for many years was an obsessively committed writer who, in the terrifying limbo between one book and another, could fall victim to a storm of depression or be […]

February 6, 2015

Writing the Suburban Wild 0

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In a longform piece for The Atlantic Diane Saverin writes about Annie Dillard‘s Pilgrim at Tinker Creek, the predominantly male tradition of wilderness-writing, and how Dillard found and wrote about the wild while living in suburbia. She also wrestles with the question: “if the author conveys a resonant truth, does it matter what experiences led to the […]

February 5, 2015

Six Plots 0

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We are all by now familiar with J.K. Rowling‘s elaborate, hand-drawn outlines for the Harry Potter series, but what if all plots could be simplified further? Down to, let’s say, graphs? And not even an infinite number of graphs, but just six? The Paris Review considers the work of Matthew Jockers, a literature professor who […]

February 5, 2015

Listening to Joyce 1

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We’ve written before about various rare recordings of authors reading that occasionally surface on the internet (a sample here) but today we add a new author: James Joyce. Open Culture has posted two recordings of the author reading from Ulysses and Finnegans Wake, and while the audio quality is exactly what you would expect for recordings […]