Curiosities Archives - Page 10 of 1001 - The Millions

July 6, 2016

America: A Review 0

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“Airing from the 1776-77 season through today, America focuses on a small ensemble of white people using things in the ground to become rich or kill brown people.” Megan Amram reviews America at McSweeney’s.

July 6, 2016

The Pen Reveals 0

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What does handwriting tell us about its author? The Atlantic investigates. Our own Kevin Hartnett explains why he writes by hand.

July 6, 2016

Oratory Passion 0

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The best Fourth of July speech? Frederick Douglass delivered it on July 5, 1852. Pair with a reading list for July.

July 6, 2016

Indie Reads 0

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The Guardian publishes an interview with my favorite indie bookstore, Harvard Book Store in Harvard Square, Cambridge, MA. Looking for book recommendations? Check out our Great Second-Half Preview.

July 6, 2016

Celebrating America’s Birthday 0

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It was America’s birthday this week. Celebrate with quintessential American fiction, according to the rest of the world (via LitHub). More of a poetry person? We search for the great American epic.

July 5, 2016

Standing Atop a Very High Wall Made of Ice 0

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“The right candidate will be a big idea thinker, meaning that they have the capacity to understand the huge idea that White Walkers are coming for us, all of us, and someone’s got to do some shit about it. If you love telling brand stories through digital mediums, can think very conceptually about social media, […]

July 5, 2016

Happy (?) Birthday, Franz 0

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Franz Kafka’s birthday was a couple of days ago — the celebration (which would surely have been a subdued affair) would have been his 133rd. Celebrate yourself by taking look at this helpful animation which explains the woefully misused term “Kafkaesque.”

July 5, 2016

Someone You’re Not 0

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We’re all frauds on the internet! Ann Leary at The Literary Hub takes a look at why online relationships tend to falter in the “real world.” Here are a couple of complementary friendship-related essays from The Millions.

July 5, 2016

Wrecked Modern Romance 0

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“[Virginie] Despentes has become a kind of cult hero, a patron saint to invisible women: the monstrous and marginalized, the sodden, weary and wildly unemployable, the kind of woman who can scarcely be propped up let alone persuaded to lean in.” On Virginie Despentes’s Bye Bye Blondie and French feminist pulp that pulls no punches.

July 5, 2016

Lerner on Berger 0

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Recommended Listening: Ben Lerner stops by The New Yorker’s fiction podcast to discuss “Woven, Sir,” a story by John Berger.