Articles by Thomas Beckwith

February 25, 2014

Last Call for MPWs 0

Last November, the University of Southern California announced that it would stop offering a Masters in Professional Writing, ending a program that counts Richard Yates and Hubert Selby, Jr. among its faculty alumni. At The Nervous Breakdown, Aram Saroyan (son of William) looks back on his time as an instructor.

February 25, 2014

Hang Out with The Rumpus, Ctd. 0

Looking to fill your schedule at this year’s AWP? The Rumpus is hosting an offsite event – featuring readings by Katie Crouch, Monica Drake, Gina Frangello and Wesley Stace — on Thursday night at 8:30.

February 25, 2014

Reading the VIDA Count 0

Yesterday, VIDA released its annual count of women in prominent magazines, and while they found that most of the magazines they looked at still publish significantly more men than women, they reported that The Paris Review and The New York Times Book Review published many more women in 2013 than they did in 2012. Amanda […]

February 25, 2014

New Paris Review Board Members 0

Word came out yesterday that Jonathan Galassi and Year in Reading alum Mona Simpson will join the Paris Review editorial board. Former editors both — Galassi edited the magazine’s poetry, while Simpson edited its fiction — the two will join Rose Styron, Jeffrey Eugenides and other notable figures on the board. Simpson also has a […]

February 25, 2014

Tuesday New Release Day: Moore; Li; Wilson; Stace; Harbach 0

Lorrie Moore, who we profiled yesterday, has a new story collection on shelves this week. Also out: Kinder Than Solitude by Yiyun Li; What’s Important is Feeling by Adam Wilson; Wonderkid by Wesley Stace; and MFA vs. NYC, a new essay collection (spun off from an n+1 piece) edited by Chad Harbach.

February 24, 2014

“Crouching alone near some tiny ecosystem” 0

Recommended Reading: Laura Miller on Jeff VanderMeer’s Annihilation.

February 24, 2014

What They Want 0

Among the raft of news stories that came out about Facebook recently, you may have missed the company’s quiet revolution in grammar, signified by its adoption of the much-debated singular “they.” If thinking about this change makes you queasy, just remember that singular “they” has been around since the days of Chaucer. (Related: Fiona Maazel […]

February 24, 2014

The Deep Also Impacts 0

Those of you out there who grew up in the 90s will remember that every disaster movie brought a slew of novelizations into bookstores. Even if the movie in question did badly, you knew that at least two adaptations of the script would pop up on shelves. At Hazlitt, Will Sloan wonders if the age […]

February 24, 2014

Fin 3

How would you feel if your novels all fell apart at the end? The writer Ann Bauer knows this feeling, and it’s painful — she says that her readers inevitably tell her the endings of her novels are all wrong. (You could also read our own Sonya Chung’s essay on literary endings.)

February 24, 2014

Neomysterativity 2

The term “academic writing” is controversial, not least because it implies that academics have an odd and persnickety way of writing. In a blog post for The New Yorker, Joshua Rothman examines the genre, looking back on his time in grad school to argue that academic writing is a “fraught and mysterious thing.”