Articles by Sonya Chung

November 30, 2009

Russian Literary News 1

Russian literary news and awards — i.e. winners and runners-up of Russia’s Big Book Award — at Lizok’s Bookshelf.

November 30, 2009

Why College Professors Don’t Envy the Young 0

On Why College Professors Don’t Envy the Young, at the Chronicle of Higher Education.

November 23, 2009

Dogs, Revolutionary Road, and The Thunderous Sea of Silence 6

On the violence of Richard Yates’s dialog, the failures of human speech in everyday life, and the silent togetherness of man and dog.

November 18, 2009

Junot Diaz on What is a Writer 0

Junot Díaz writes in O. Magazine about the harrowing, doubt-and-terror-filled decade-plus he spent writing his Pulitzer-prize winning first novel, The Brief Wondrous Life of Oscar Wao.

November 10, 2009

Rosenbaum on Nabokov’s Laura 0

Slate’s Ron Rosenbaum talks with Brooke Gladstone of NPRs On the Media about posthumous publishing, specifically Nabokov, but also Kafka and in general.

November 6, 2009

This Is Michael Jackson 12

What could be more compelling than film footage of the King of Pop so clearly not meant for our eyes?

November 3, 2009

Maureen Corrigan on Lacuna 0

NPR’s Maureen Corrigan applauds Barbara Kingsolver‘s Lacuna for “single-handedly keeping consumer zest alive for the literary novel,” as “the only literary novel caught in the cross hairs” of the price wars waged by Wal-mart, Amazon, and Target against booksellers (the others being genre novels).  As for the book itself: “I wish I could say she […]

November 2, 2009

Polygamy the New Feminism? 0

Fans intrigued/disturbed by the real-life look at polygamy from the perspective of women in the HBO series “Big Love” might be interested in this bit of news from Siberia.

November 1, 2009

PW’s Top 10 of 2009 0

Publisher’s Weekly has released a Top 10 adult books list for 2009, fiction and non-fiction.  Click here for the (perhaps surprising) list, including reviews.

October 30, 2009

Sergei Dovlatov, Funny Families, and That Tall Brown Fence 11

The New Yorker published nine of Dovlatov’s stories between 1981 and 1989. Why is he so little known or read in the West today?