Articles by Nick Moran

September 21, 2011

SPD Books Discount 0

SPD Books’ staff picks are 40% off!

September 21, 2011

OYC to Print 0

Selections from Open Yale Courses are headed to print. As program director John Donatich explains, “At first glance, you might look at it skeptically and ask why would anybody pay for something that you can get for free. But on second glance you realize that it’s actually not the same thing at all.”

September 21, 2011

Silverstein in the News 0

Shel Silverstein is the subject of two articles this week courtesy of The Atlantic and The New York Times.

September 21, 2011

Art Beyond America 0

Ever wonder what vintage Indian pulp book covers would look like? How about Czech movie posters from the 1970’s? Maybe Belarusian movie posters circa 2007?

September 20, 2011

“The truth of poetry is not the truth of history” 0

Philip Levine is the current US Poet Laureate, and that’s great, but wouldn’t we all rather live in this alternate world fashioned by The Onion?

September 19, 2011

College Football, Academics, and Great Journalism 0

College football season is upon us, and I’d be remiss not to highlight the recent flood of fantastic writing on my favorite televised sport. Most striking is Pulitzer Prize-winner Taylor Branch‘s Atlantic article “The Shame of College Sports.” It’s accompanied by several other takes on the issue. In regards to academia, this New York Times […]

September 19, 2011

WWII-era NYC… In Living Color 1

These color photographs of WWII-era New York City may rival those color photographs of pre-revolutionary Russia.

September 19, 2011

“Dressed to the nines, ready for the first martini” 0

Next time you wait for your date to finish getting ready, occupy yourself with a poem.

September 19, 2011

Cities 0

The Atlantic asks, “Why do cities matter?” In its own way, n+1‘s City by City series can be read as a response.

September 19, 2011

“Perfect translation … is of course impossible.” 1

Ever wonder how Google Translate works? Now you know. These two pieces (one and two) on Lydia Davis‘ translation of Madame Bovary are worth revisiting, too.