Articles by Matt Seidel

August 19, 2014

Back to School: Six Strategies for Effective Close Reading 0

Close reading produces knowledge, and knowledge can be painful.

August 8, 2014

A New Lease on Apathy: On Samuel Beckett’s Echo’s Bones 1

No one is tougher on a Beckett character than Beckett, and perhaps no character receives as much abuse as the first major one, Belacqua Shuah.

July 23, 2014

Viral Professors 0

How would fictional professors, heroes of those quaint works known as campus novels, fare in the world of online education?

July 10, 2014

The Scourge of the Peloton: On Tim Krabbé’s The Rider 0

In honor of the Tour de France, taking to the couch with Tim Krabbé’s sports classic.

June 18, 2014

A Piano Quartet 0

While the following three piano-themed books — Alan Rusbridger’s Play it Again, Thomas Bernhard’s The Loser, and Murray Bail’s extraordinary The Voyage — are all inexplicably devoid of sniper rifles, they do present slightly more nuanced takes on perfection and its discontents.

May 21, 2014

Epitaphs for the Novel 7

“Who would not sing for Lycidas?” asks Milton in his famous elegy. And who, indeed, would not sing for the Novel, which has once again been declared dead?

May 20, 2014

The Press Novel: From Scoop to Amy Rowland’s The Transcriptionist 1

“But do you think it’s a good way of training oneself — inventing imaginary news?” “None better.”

May 9, 2014

The Worst Book Review Ever 21

While professional duty compels me to deliver judgment on the work at hand, I cannot in good conscience reveal the title, author or any identifying details about its plot for fear that some perverse soul might be tempted to go out and buy it.

April 25, 2014

Kafka on the Go: Rereading The Metamorphosis 0

I had been casting about for the perfect title when I saw Susan Bernofsky’s new translation of The Metamorphosis at an airport bookstore, the beautiful cover submitting the title letters to the same transformative process as the book’s protagonist undergoes. This, I decided, would be my companion text as I semi-reclined on a plane, lay in bed, sat in a café, strolled upright in a park, and bellied up to a bar.

April 18, 2014

Transylvanians Gone Wild: On Miklós Bánffy’s Transylvanian Trilogy 0

This might not be the thing one wants to hear before embarking on a 1,500 page quest, but the trilogy is marked by a narrative desultoriness that applies to both its human and political dramas. The novels are in a some ways about widespread distraction and inaction in the face of an impending catastrophe.

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