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Shakespeare’s Greatest Play? 5 Experts Share Their Opinions

By posted at 6:00 am on May 5, 2014 17

Shakespeare

William Shakespeare’s 450th birthday is upon us, and at The Millions we wanted to celebrate it in 21st century American style, by debating which of his 38 plays is the best. (Actually, we might have been even more of our time and place if we’d tried to denote his worst.) This exercise comes with the usual caveats about how every play is special and to each his own when it comes to art. But waffling didn’t serve Hamlet well and it’s no fun in this situation, either! We asked five Shakespeare experts to name their favorite play and defend it as the Bard’s best, and they certainly made good on that request. Below you’ll find five persuasively argued cases for five different plays. These contributions may not settle the matter once and for all (though I was happy to see a very strong case made for my personal favorite play), but you’ll certainly learn a lot from them and likely be inspired to dust off your Shakespeare reader or take to the theater next time a production of [insert name of best play here] comes to town. And, really, what better birthday present could we give ole William than that?

coverHamlet

Ros Barber is author of The Marlowe Papers.

I would like to be more daring, but when pressed to name Shakespeare’s best work, I can only argue for Hamlet. You could have asked me which play I consider his most underrated (Cymbeline) or which one I feel most personally attached to (As You Like It). But best? Hamlet is iconic.

From the first report of his father’s ghost to the final corpse-strewn scene, Hamlet epitomizes the word “drama.” Shakespeare’s wit, playfulness, and linguistic skills are at their most honed. Everything Shakespeare does well in other plays he does brilliantly here. His characters are at their most human, his language is at its wittiest and most inventive. The heights he has been reaching for in every play before 1599, he achieves fully in Hamlet. The play contains a line of poetry so famous I don’t even need to quote it. Then there’s “Oh that this too, too solid flesh…” — the finest soliloquy in the canon. The memorable images that arise from Hamlet have soaked into Western culture so thoroughly that even someone who has never seen the play is liable, when presented with a human skull, to lift it before them and start intoning “Alas, poor Yorick…”

The role of Hamlet is the role that every actor wants to play. Supporting roles such as Ophelia and even incidental roles such as Rosencrantz and Guildenstern have spawned major works of art. And – “the play’s the thing” – the play within a play is called The Mousetrap, and by the influence of its title alone appears to have spawned the longest-running show of any kind in the world. There is some kind of radical energy in Hamlet, and it has been feeding artists, writers, and actors for over four hundred years.

When I wrote The Marlowe Papers, whose premise is that William Shakespeare was a playbroker who agreed to “front” for Christopher Marlowe after he faked his death to escape execution, I knew from the outset that I had to elevate this already genius writer to the point where he was capable of writing Hamlet. Not Othello, not King Lear, but Hamlet. It’s the pinnacle of Shakespeare’s artistic achievement. Hands down.

coverThe Winter’s Tale

Rev Dr Paul Edmondson is Head of Research for The Shakespeare Birthplace Trust. His current projects include www.shakespeareontheroad.com, a big road trip of Shakespeare festivals across the United States and North America in Summer 2014. You can follow him on Twitter at @paul_edmondson.

For emotional high-points, it doesn’t come much better than The Winter’s Tale: the evocation of the loving friendship between the two kings; the sudden and expressionistic jealousy of King Leontes and his cruel treatment of Queen Hermione; her tender moments with her son, the young Prince Mamillius; her trial and condemnation; her death quickly followed by the death of Mamillius; the banishment of her baby, the new princess; the bear that chases Antigonus off the stage. And then the passage of time.

I love the way that, every time I see it, this play manages to convince me I’ve entered a whole new world in its second half, a pastoral romance, and that I’ve left behind the tragedy of the earlier acts. And then it all comes magically back to where we started from, with new people who have a different stake in the future. We are sixteen years on but when we return it’s as if we know the place for the first time.

Then the final moments when the statue of Hermione comes to life. It’s a magical story and a miracle of a moment, not least because of the physical challenges it places on the actress to stand as still as she needs to. For these reasons it is the Shakespeare play above all that I find to be genuinely the most moving. The director Adrian Noble, when asked which was his favorite Shakespeare play used to reply, “You mean after The Winter’s Tale?” When this play is performed I see audience members reaching for their handkerchiefs and walking out of the theatre with tears in their eyes. “You can keep your Hamlets, you can keep your Othellos,” a friend of mine once said to me at the end of one performance, “give me The Winter’s Tale any day.” And I agree with him.

coverHenry V

Laura Estill is Assistant Professor of English, Texas A&M University, and editor of the World Shakespeare Bibliography.

Of course there is no single best Shakespeare play: there is only the play that speaks best to a reader, scholar, theatre practitioner, or audience member at a given moment. Today, the play that speaks most to me is Henry V. Henry V is not just a great history play — it is a play about how we create and encounter history and how we mythologize greatness. Throughout the play, a chorus comments on the difficulties of (re)presenting history. The prologue’s opening lines capture the play’s energy:

 O for a Muse of fire, that would ascend

The brightest heaven of invention,

A kingdom for a stage, princes to act

And monarchs to behold the swelling scene!

Henry V is part of a series of four Shakespeare plays, the Henriad, named for Henry V. The Henriad traces Henry’s claim to the throne and his calculated move from a carousing youth to a powerful leader. Henry V brings together threads from the earlier plays in the tetralogy (Richard II, 1 & 2 Henry IV) and is haunted by the ghost of Falstaff, one of Shakespeare’s most endearing characters. The play has meaning not just as a standalone piece, but as part of a network of texts, including other contemporary history plays and the historical accounts that Shakespeare used as his sources (notably, Holinshed’s Chronicles of England, Scotland, and Ireland).

Shakespeare’s plays reflect the preoccupations of their readers and audiences; it is the multiple interpretations (both by scholars and performers) that make these works valuable. The counterpoints that Shakespeare presents in Henry V invite the audience to consider how we think of ourselves and what it means to be a strong leader. Shakespeare contrasts Henry’s moving and eloquent speeches (“we few, we happy few, we band of brothers”) with the toll of war on common people (“few die well that die in a battle”). Some people see Henry as the greatest English king; others point to Henry’s threat to impale infants on pikes. The epilogue raises Henry as “the star of England” yet also reminds audiences that his son will lose everything Henry has fought to gain.

Although all of Shakespeare’s plays can be approached from multiple angles, not all have remained perennially popular like Henry V. Whether it stars Kenneth Branagh (1989), Tom Hiddleston (2012, The Hollow Crown) or Jude Law (2013, Noel Coward Theatre), Henry V is a great play because it raises more questions than it answers.

coverKing Lear

Doug Lanier is Professor of English and Director of the London Program at the University of New Hampshire. He’s written Shakespeare and Modern Popular Culture (2002) and is working on a book on Othello on-screen.

King Lear is the Mount Everest of Shakespeare – often forbiddingly bleak and challenging, but for those who scale it, it offers an unparalleled vista on man’s condition and its own form of rough beauty. More than any other Shakespeare play, Lear exemplifies what Immanuel Kant labeled the “sublime,” by which he meant those objects that inspire an awe that simply dwarves us rather than charms.

King Lear explores human identity stripped of the trappings of power, civilization, comfort, and reason, what Lear calls “unaccommodated man,” the self radically vulnerable to the vagaries of an indifferent universe and the cruelties of others. That Shakespeare’s protagonist is a king and patriarch, for early modern society the very pinnacle of society, makes his precipitous fall all the more terrifying. The image of Lear huddled with a beggar and a fool in a hovel on a moor while a storm rages outside is one of the most resonant – and desolate – literary representations of the human condition. Equally bracing is Gloucester’s reward for loyalty to his fellow patriarch: in one of Shakespeare’s most daring onstage moments, Gloucester is blinded before our eyes, an instance of cruelty which even today has the power to shock.

How to live on with knowledge of our fundamental condition is the play’s central preoccupation. Paradoxically, it is precisely the world’s bleakness and our own vulnerability that makes the ephemeral glimmers of love within it all the more valuable. Lear opens the play by asking his daughters to display their love, and his painful recognition of who truly loves him drives the action of the play. Love is so ineffable in Lear that it is typically expressed in minimal language, as if almost beyond words. Cordelia says “nothing” to Lear’s demand for love, and later when her father asks her forgiveness, she replies with understated poignancy, “no cause, no cause.” At play’s end Lear’s anguished love for the dead Cordelia is expressed in a single, excruciatingly repeated final word – “never, never, never, never, never” – in a line which captures at once his guilt, his need for love, his protest against the cruel circumstances of existence, his irremediable pain.

What makes King Lear difficult is its virtue: Shakespeare’s willingness to look a comfortless cosmos directly in the eye and not to turn toward easy consolation. Lear’s world is recognizably our own, our own terrestrial hovel in the dark cosmic storm. And the play’s exceptional power remains its capacity to remind us that hope and love, however fleeting, remain that world’s most precious resource.

coverOthello

Elisa Oh is Assistant Professor of English at Howard University. She has published articles on King Lear, The Tragedy of Mariam, and Wroth’s Urania, and her current book project explores representations of race and gender in early modern dance.

Choosing my favorite Shakespeare play is like choosing my favorite child. However, for the sake of the argument, I throw down the gauntlet in favor of Othello. This is why it’s great: First, Othello shows us how language and stories create reality; second, the play reveals both heroic loyalty and the vengeful, perverse underbelly of same-sex friendship; and finally, it challenges us to realize how easy and harmful it is to racialize and essentialize others’ identities.

Language itself manipulates reality with powerful effects throughout Othello. Language causes characters to fall in love and to fall in hate with each other. Desdemona falls in love with Othello’s stories of wartime adventures, and Othello falls into an obsessive jealous hatred through Iago’s stories of Desdemona’s imagined liaison with Cassio and others. Othello wants “ocular proof” of her infidelity, but he ultimately accepts Iago’s words in place of seeing an actual illicit sex act, and then Othello begins misreading outward signs of innocence as evidence of inner corruption, because he already “knows” the truth. Iago’s diabolical success and sinister final silence demonstrate the ultimate incomprehensibility of evil, which may exceed the bounds of linguistic articulation.

Desdemona’s loyalty to Othello, even when he mistreats and kills her, and Emilia’s loyalty to Desdemona, even when speaking in her defense results in Emilia’s death, cause us to admire their transcendent steadfastness and to question the proper limits of self-sacrifice. Though “race” had less stable meaning for Shakespeare than it does for us today, the play continues to generate important conversations about how we “racialize” others or define them as possessing certain essential inner qualities based on exterior features, religion, ethnicity, or nationality. Even the venomous serpent of internalized racism uncoils itself in Othello’s self-recriminations following his murder of Desdemona.

Witnessing the dis-integration of Othello’s love and trust in Desdemona is not a pleasant experience; if the criteria for “greatness” included audience pleasure, then one of the festive comedies would certainly come before this tragedy. However, taking each step down that sickening descent into murderous jealousy with Othello has the painful but useful result of making us question why and how this was possible with a passionate intensity bred out of a sense of injustice. The play serves as a magnifying glass that focuses conflicts about belief and disbelief; language and silence; loyalty and revenge; love and lust; blackness and whiteness with a growing intensity that becomes excruciatingly brilliant, unbearably burning, and finally cathartically destructive and revelatory.

Image via Wikimedia Commons





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17 Responses to “Shakespeare’s Greatest Play? 5 Experts Share Their Opinions”

  1. Robert Valente
    at 11:30 am on May 5, 2014

    You cannot no put Macbeth on this list.

  2. Dana Stabenow
    at 1:01 pm on May 5, 2014

    Tsk. The Tempest. Obviously.

  3. James
    at 4:03 pm on May 5, 2014

    A bit of a muddled question being asked here, it seems, where “favorite” must become “best.” But more interesting for that.

    So I’ll stump for the highly muddled and highly interesting Measure for Measure.

  4. Matt
    at 4:37 pm on May 5, 2014

    (We ) academics try to be too original (see G. Vico’s conceit of the scholars ).
    Best play -should there be any need to single out the “best” in the first place – like the phenomenon of the Beatles – should be popular and iconic as well as ambitious enough to win the acclaim of most scholars.

    I’d go for King Lear – versatile, rife with classic wisdoms and universal meaning.
    King Lear is practically the only Shakespeare’s great play to, potentially, advocate the cause of the (feminine) subaltern.

  5. Rahul
    at 6:23 pm on May 5, 2014

    Macbeth has to be on the list. One of the most fantastic plays ever

  6. Alan
    at 7:09 pm on May 5, 2014

    Flawed and brutal as it is, I was hoping to see someone press the case for Titus Andronicus here. Something of a Pulp Fiction of it’s day, it has been my favourite since I first saw it.

  7. odjit
    at 9:47 pm on May 5, 2014

    I agree with Alan that I love Titus Andronicus and my personal favorite is Much Ado About Nothing, but of the ones on this list, I can only really get behind Othello.

  8. drea
    at 11:07 pm on May 5, 2014

    Hamlet is the play that evokes the most passion in my students who produce a Shakespeare play every year. They love every one they do, but Hamlet challenges them and their passion for the play is palpable – it’s a hit.

  9. cassie
    at 12:15 am on May 6, 2014

    my favorite play by shakespeare is for sure as you like it… then again, i’m extremely biased. the best play in my opinion, however, is definitely hamlet. i’ve never seen people get behind a shakespearean play like they do with that play. it draws out a passion, just like drea said.

  10. Peter Fay
    at 3:53 am on May 6, 2014

    The best has to be 12th Night!
    The humour, the wit, the repartee and the sarcasm, that still rises way above the serious stories within.

  11. steve kerensky
    at 8:51 am on May 6, 2014

    For a long time now, I`ve thought it was The Tempest, which picks out the root of our problems with existence. The root has many bifurcations and the play teaches us we learn that we must be tolerant and not just follow one line, that even the most creative,even a deity, will be confronted with problems that may prove insoluble.

    As drama, as a view of people in crisis, the best is Hamlet, which also has the most profound poetics. But The Tempest has it by nose, as it suggests there are ways forward and upward, in spite of human failings.

  12. Pushpa Knottenbelt
    at 12:33 pm on May 6, 2014

    Hard to choose one. I love so many for different reasons. The first I studied was Henry V and the last I taught was Hamlet – both very special!

  13. Germane Jackson
    at 4:13 pm on May 6, 2014

    Macbeth is great but I’ve always thought it seemed somewhat psychologically simple and simplistic compared to Hamlet/Othello/Lear. Prideful ambition destroys everything, basically. It’s archetypal and wonderfully quotable, of course, but somewhat unsurprising, with comparatively little interesting subtext and ambiguity. I kind of think of it as Shakespeare’s genre thriller moment.

  14. Richard Grayson
    at 11:13 am on May 9, 2014

    My favorite is “Twelfth Night,” possibly because it’s the first play of Shakespeare’s that I read and saw performed fifty years ago. But the best Shakespeare play is usually the one that I’m about to read or see next.

  15. wizbiz
    at 1:23 am on May 28, 2014

    Shakespeare’s a brilliant writer but he’s not infallible. I’ve downloaded off the net about a dozen of his plays present side by side with the modern english translations, and I’ve got to say that several of them, even when I can understand clearly what’s going on are down right dull. Other’s are gorgeous beyond words, I especially like Shakespeare when he brings in lovely metaphors about nature so for that reason I’m going to say The Tempest and R+J are my favorites so far. I also liked Orseno’s (sp?) opening monologue in 12th night.

  16. 10 Fragments: The Fault in Our Stars | Notes from Underground
    at 1:32 pm on July 6, 2014

    […] the Book of Job, Dostoevsky’s The Brothers Karamazov, Shakespeare’s King Lear (the “Mount Everest” of all his plays). The final  lines of King Lear read: “The weight of these sad times we […]

  17. Ishandeb Tula
    at 7:09 am on September 21, 2014

    I believe hamlet is surely Shakespeare’s best play and among the finest tragedies of all time…

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