Year in Reading

A Year in Reading: Khaled Hosseini

By posted at 6:00 am on December 9, 2013 2

coverWe Are All Completely Beside Ourselves by Karen Joy Fowler: I thought this was a gripping, big-hearted book about a family’s falling apart after a young daughter is sent away. Who – or what – the young daughter is can’t be discussed without revealing a major spoiler, suffice it to say it is a whopper. The book is far deeper and more ambitious, however, than its central conceit would lead one to think. Through the tender voice of her protagonist, Fowler has a lot to say about family, memory, language, science, and indeed the question of what constitutes a human being.

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2 Responses to “A Year in Reading: Khaled Hosseini”

  1. Kerry
    at 8:46 am on December 9, 2013

    The ideal introduction to Fowler’s dazzling, humane, and heartbreaking achievement. Many thanks.

  2. A Year in Reading: Bloomers Edition | Bloom
    at 7:01 pm on January 2, 2014

    […] Several other writers we’ve spotlighted here at Bloom have contributed to 2013’s “Year in Reading.” One is Paul Harding, who raved about Chinelo Okparanta’s Happiness, Like Water (2013). Another entry comes from Norman Rush, whose own novel Subtle Bodies (2013) also made it onto Garth Risk Hallberg’s list. (Be sure to check out Joseph M. Schuster’s feature on and two-part conversation with Harding, as well as Jennifer Acker Shah’s piece on Rush’s novels of ideas.) Other Bloomers who have contributed to the YiR include Caleb Crain and Khaled Hosseini. […]

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