Year in Reading

A Year In Reading: Charles Blackstone

By posted at 3:00 pm on December 19, 2013 4

At the end of a year, it’s often hard to remember what I read in the preceding 12 months. This has to do with all the wine I’ve consumed throughout the seasons and the eggnog in which I’m probably swimming for the month of December, but also it has to do with sheer number of the books themselves. I write books. I’m managing editor of Bookslut. I read. A lot. But I’m often left yearning for something more in what I read. I want that kind of indelible experience I used to have with the books that meant something to me long ago — the experience that, the older I get, the less likely I think I’m going to have. But I’m still a reader, so I never stop hoping I’ll come across the book that’s not just going to be one of my favorite novels of the year, but quite possibly one of my favorite novels of life. The book I bring to you at the end of 2013 is nothing if not indelible.

coverLong after reading it, it’s still inconceivable to me just how good Tampa by Alissa Nutting is. Celeste Price is the kind of narrator whose words you want to keep on your skin forever. And she’s one hell of a protagonist. She’s brilliant. She’s mad (or easily perceived that way). She’s a physically attractive object to the point of paralyzing her onlookers. She’s iconoclastic. She’s funny. She’s an allegory with a little red Corvette, which is probably itself a Northern Floridian metaphor. She’s a teacher in the classroom, but she’s not a didact for the reader. She’s Nabokovian, and not simply because she bangs 14-year-olds. She lives on the page, and yet she’s absolutely, utterly, impossibly real. I couldn’t get her out of my mind after the first sentence.

Tampa really is a joyous and momentous occasion for prose. And yet, of course, some readers haven’t understood it, have declaimed against it — particularly those who haven’t actually read it. A 26-year old teacher — a female teacher, no less — who takes up, unrepentantly, with a 14-year-old boy in her class? Say just that much, and you can already hear the murmurs: On purpose? Well, that’s just terrible. End of story. Lock her up at once. Oh, she’s a character in a novel? In that case, we’d better lock up the book. Because complacency shouldn’t be riled! We’re not supposed to write or read these sorts of things, and if a book does happen to emerge, we must eradicate it at once (by way of repudiation, of course, of course, because free speech, etc.). Critical thought and analysis is reserved for the nice books, the polite books, the books that know their places. As far as the outliers go, we’re supposed to vilify, never empathize. At least that’s how the mass media would have it.

I say, bullshit! Hasn’t it always been the case that art is supposed to make you question your assumptions? And radically so? And really good art takes all of your assumptions away and reinvents you? That’s what Tampa does.

The problem people have with Tampa has nothing to do with the novel, its author, or its characters. The problem people have with this book comes from within. They’re afraid of themselves. Reading a novel like Tampa pretty much forces you to scrutinize the world — and yourself. True art reminds us of us — of what’s right with us and also what’s wrong. And we need it to.

If I could have just one wish this Christmas, it would be for you to read Tampa. But only if you think you’re ready. And I think you are. You’re tired of slogging through the kinds of books that leave faint impressions on you before quickly and permanently disappearing. If you’re lucky, and you let yourself, Tampa might just change your (reading) life.

More from A Year in Reading 2013

Don’t miss: A Year in Reading 2012, 2011, 2010, 2009, 2008, 2007, 2006, 2005

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4 Responses to “A Year In Reading: Charles Blackstone”

  1. Rachel
    at 4:51 pm on December 19, 2013

    Well, crap. I was going to ignore Tampa for the reasons Blackstone lists, but this post is so convincing that I’m already done with the ten uninterrupted pages Amazon “Look Inside” gives me, and I’m hooked.

  2. Owen
    at 6:28 pm on December 21, 2013

    This is a very poor recommendation. Why should we read Tampa? The quality of the writing, the quality of the plotting? Or because it’s soft on nonces?

  3. Owen
    at 6:30 pm on December 21, 2013

    You do mention prose, but I really don’t believe that based on 2 pages.

  4. Dan
    at 1:38 pm on December 22, 2013

    Owen if you have to ask why read the book Blackstone recommends after reading this piece the book probably isn’t for you. Come to think of it reading probably isn’t for you either. I suggest you stick with Big Macs and sandcastles. About your speed.

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