Ask the Writing Teacher

Ask the Writing Teacher: Novelists on First Drafts

By posted at 12:00 pm on February 27, 2013 12

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Dear Writing Teacher,

I am a published fiction writer who is about to start writing a new novel. You would think, since I’ve already done this before, that I knew what I was doing. But I don’t. I am lost. Where do I start? What do I need to know about my story and my characters before I begin? What should I just figure out as I go? Suddenly, the idea of writing that first draft seems impossible, and I am terrified.

I’d greatly appreciate any guidance you could offer me!

Sincerely,
Facing the Blank Page

Man oh man, I could’ve written this question to myself! I, too, am about to start a new novel, and I’m wondering how in the hell I did it before (two times, in fact), and how in the hell I’ll ever do it again. Take comfort in the fact that you aren’t alone in your despair; thousands of writers face their white screens every day, uncertain of how to proceed. I’ve heard from many authors that each novel offers its own unique demands, its own unique joys, and that you must re-learn the process with each go. Let that inspire rather than scare you — would you really want a redundant experience?

covercoverIn this essay, excerpted from the book Why We Write: 20 Acclaimed Authors on How and Why They Do What They Do, Jennifer Egan talks about the process of writing Look At Me:

It was a huge struggle. I’m not quite sure why I suffered to the degree I did while working on that book, but I do know that my work up to that point had been fairly conventional, and I didn’t know if anyone would accept this kind of book from me. It was almost as if I thought I’d be punished for it. I felt afraid as I worked on it. I thought it was terrible, that I was reaching too far.

At the same time, some of the most exciting moments I’ve had as a writer were during the writing of that book, even with all those worries and that feeling of doom. One day I read the first six chapters of the book in one sitting, and I tore out of the house and went running, and I had this sense that I’d never read anything quite like that before, that I’d done something really different. That was such a thrilling feeling — a rarity as I was working on it.

I keep returning to this passage as I begin to think about my own new book. Why should I be afraid to be challenged? If the writing will be painful, then it will be painful. Just as often, it won’t be. I simply must sit down and see.

coverAs for how one goes about writing a first draft, I like to practice the art of acceptance.  In The Getaway Car: A Practical Memoir About Writing and Life, Ann Patchett describes how she plans much of her novel in her head before she sets a word of it on paper. Her dear friend and reader, Elizabeth McCracken, is a very different kind of novelist. Patchett writes, “I get everything set in my head and then I go, whereas Elizabeth will write her way into her characters’ world, trying out scenes, writing backstories she’ll never use.  We marvel at each other’s process, and for me it’s a constant reminder that there isn’t one way to do this work.” Amen to that! Novel writing can be fun, but it can also be daunting and challenging, more frustrating than untangling the necklaces at the bottom of your jewelry box. The last thing you need is to question your own process.

Still, when I’m writing a first draft, I, like you, long for some direction. Does it make sense to figure out the retrospective voice now, or can I deal with that later? Should I do the research now, or is it a second draft problem? How about chapter length — does that matter now? (Does it matter ever?) There are so many questions zipping across a lonely writer’s head as she sits at her desk working.

I decided to ask some writers I admire what they try to figure out with their first drafts. What, I asked them, do you need to know before you begin? And what do you try to solve as you’re working on that first draft?

Their answers were as brilliant and as varied as I expected:

coverMy opinion is that you want to figure out character and plot in the first draft. I think it’s also a good idea to have the setting nailed down in the first draft, if possible; moving the narrative to another location can entail some pretty tedious rewrites. It’s also a good idea to figure out whether the book’s going to be in the first person or the third person as early on as possible, because changing pages and pages of text from one to the other is an insanely labor-intensive process.

My feeling is that you don’t need to waste your time obsessing over pacing in the first draft, because that’s the kind of thing that can change completely in revisions. In your first round of revisions you’ll inevitably end up cutting a lot of material, and that will change the pace of the book, so I think pacing is something best refined toward the end of the process.

-Emily St. John Mandel, author of The Lola Quartet

cover I think my answer might be a little bit controversial — I think almost nothing is worth sweating in the first draft. Does a character need to change genders? Do you want to shift the structure? Just do it, and keep moving forward. Finishing a draft of a novel is so hard, and so enormous, that one needs all the momentum possible. If you stop and go back to the beginning every time you want to change something, you will never finish. Just go go go! You will have the time to go back and fix all your mistakes, right your wrongs, etc. Just get to the end of the first draft. The feeling of accomplishment is sweet enough to spur you on to make even the most major changes in revision.

-Emma Straub, author of Laura Lamont’s Life in Pictures

coverIn the first draft I’m just trying to figure out what the story is or might be. I’m trying to learn the story, and trying to stay open to the possibilities that the original idea might be capable of generating. The only way to learn the story is by writing it, but how do you write it when you have only the vaguest notion of what the story is, and who the characters might be? That’s a problem. The problem, eh? The only way I learn it is by writing it line by line, page by page.

My expectations for first drafts are pretty low. I don’t worry about polishing the language at all, or fine-tuning character or plot. I’m basically just trying to figure out what the story might be.

-Ben Fountain, author of Billy Lynn’s Long Halftime Walk

coverThere’s a huge gap between what I need to know and what I do know when I begin a novel. If I waited until I knew at least thirty percent of what I should know before diving in, I think I’d be permanently stuck on the springboard. Normally (and I’m talking from the experience of a meager two books here) I know two things: a place and a person. The place is usually vivid. I could go on about it for pages. But the person is a cardboard cut out—two dimensional. Magician. Musician. Drunk. Shopkeeper. What I have to force myself to figure out is a single incident that sets the story in motion. It might be removed later on, but I need to pick one action which might cause this person to move about this place. Since I know so little about my character(s) when I first commit them to paper, I tend to overwrite them, cramming all sorts of overblown background detail into my first draft, which in turn drags down what little plot I initially have. My second draft is all about fixing that balance, pruning the obsessive background information and replacing it with more action in the novel’s present.

-Ivy Pochoda, author of the forthcoming Visitation Street

coverFor me, the first draft is really just a big mud-rolling, dust-kicking, mess-making time in which my only job is to find the story’s heartbeat.  I allow myself to invent characters without warning, drop them if they prove to be uninteresting, change the setting in the middle, experiment with point of view, etc.  I figure that the body will grow up around the heart, that it’s always possible to bring all the various elements up and down, sculpt and polish, as long as I’ve got something that matters to me.  The second draft (and the 3rd through 20th, Lord help me) involves getting out the tool belt and thinking like a carpenter.  But the first draft is all dirt and water and seeds and, hopefully, a little magic.  Of course, this method means that my first draft is almost unreadable.  Maybe someday I’ll invent a way of making a slightly cleaner mess, but until then, I try to enjoy the muck.

Ramona Ausubel, author of No One is Here is Except All of Us

coverThe thing I try to resist in writing my first drafts is getting too caught up in the sentences. I am capable of revising “The cat sat on the mat,” a dozen times and then coming back to the original. At the same time I think that two of the most crucial decisions we make when writing a novel are about the music and the tone so I am always hoping to discover those as I work on my first draft.

I try in my first drafts to make as many decisions about character as I can stand. It’s tempting to leave things vague but I do think it’s very helpful to know a character’s name, age, class, occupation, manner of speech, and have some sense of physical appearance as early as possible. That said it will often take me much of a first draft to decide that Rosemary is thirty-two, a physiotherapist …. It is hard in revision to, for example, change a character’s name — it becomes part of the music of the prose — but I’ve often had to.

I try in my first draft to decide what kind of species my chapter or section will be, and how time will pass.

And I try in my first draft to make as many decisions about plot as I can. What journey are these characters on? What is their destination? Often I notice in revision that I have several scenes which all do the same thing in terms of characterization and plot and I will end up picking the best, or combining them.

I try to remind myself that the first person for whom I’m writing is myself; some of what I write in the first draft is scaffolding. It helps me to get the story under way but the reader doesn’t need to see it. And I can dismantle it later.

-Margot Livesey, author, most recently, of The Flight of Gemma Hardy

coverFor the first draft I need to know only enough to keep going. No more, no less.

-Antoine Wilson, author of Panorama City

I hope that’s a little helpful, my dear writer.  Now, on with it: get to work.

Sincerely,
The Writing Teacher

Got a question? Send all queries about craft, technique, or the writing life to [email protected].





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12 Responses to “Ask the Writing Teacher: Novelists on First Drafts”

  1. Johanna van Zanten
    at 10:42 pm on February 27, 2013

    I found this a thoroughly enjoyable and very useful piece, as I am just starting on my third novel with a more difficult angle and subjects not as wel known to me as my previous works. Starting is thefore much more difficult this time. Good to read that like others, I have to find my own process.
    Thanks so much,
    Johanna

  2. Ask the Writing Teacher: Novelists on First Drafts | Astigmatic Revelations
    at 11:26 pm on February 27, 2013

    [...] Ask the Writing Teacher: Novelists on First Drafts [...]

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    at 12:02 am on February 28, 2013

    [...] article is called, Ask the Writing Teacher: Novelists on First Drafts, and begins with a letter that [...]

  4. Linkness. What we’ve been reading | March 1, 2013 | NEXTNESS
    at 8:40 am on February 28, 2013

    [...] “Where do I start? What do I need to know about my story and my characters before I begin? What should I just figure out as I go? Suddenly, the idea of writing that first draft of a novel seems impossible, and I am terrified.” | The Millions [...]

  5. Novelists on First Drafts | Ian Riggins
    at 10:49 am on February 28, 2013

    [...] There’s a great article up at The Millions in which novelists (including Jennifer Egan and Ann Patchett) describe the process of writing first drafts. This was really useful to me as someone working on the first draft of a first novel, which hasn’t always been a pretty thing. Check it out. [...]

  6. Mary Celeste
    at 1:51 pm on February 28, 2013

    Seems kind of like falling in love again. When a great relationship ends, sometimes we wonder if we can ever fall in love again. But, we do (if we want to).

  7. Friday Links | Writing and Rambling
    at 8:02 am on March 1, 2013

    [...] Ask the Writing Teacher: Novelists on First Drafts – Some words of wisdom from various authors, as collected by Edan Lepucki for The Millions. [...]

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    at 3:47 pm on March 10, 2013

    [...] You’ll find an article with other first draft stories over at The Millions. [...]

  9. Magpie Monday | Robert E. Stutts
    at 1:32 am on March 18, 2013

    [...] Ask the Writing Teacher: Novelists on First Drafts. Good stuff from Jennifer Egan, Ann Patchett, Emily St. John Mandel, Emma Straub, Ben Fountain, Ivy Pochoda, Ramona Ausubel, Margot Livesey, and Antoine Wilson. Via. [...]

  10. Marshall
    at 11:03 pm on May 21, 2013

    I can’t believe not a single writer mentioned outlining. Wow.

  11. A Cautionary Tale | Reinventing Life at 64
    at 10:06 pm on May 23, 2013

    [...] Lepucki, who runs an advice column for writers at The Millions, was recently asked about how to approach first drafts. She turned to various [...]

  12. Karlo Sevilla
    at 7:48 pm on November 19, 2013

    Wow…May you never tire of writing much-needed advice for writers. You are much needed.

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