Are Run-On Subtitles Literature’s New Flop Sweat?

By posted at 6:00 am on April 11, 2011 16

While writing my very first blurb recently – it was for an old friend’s new book about the creation of America’s interstate highways – I was delighted to discover that this otherwise very strong piece of work had just two weak points.  One was the title, The Big Roads, which strikes me as a big snore.  The other was the subtitle, a panting pileup of purplish prose: The Untold Story of the Engineers, Visionaries, and Trailblazers Who Created the American Superhighways.

covercoverSuddenly, every time I walked into a bookstore or read a review, I started noticing similarly breathless subtitles. What had struck me initially as an unfortunate decision by the publisher of The Big Roads now began to look like a full-blown trend. Two books in particular fed this dawning revelation – Moby Duck: The True Story of 28,800 Bath Toys Lost At Sea and of the Beachcombers, Oceanographers, Environmentalists and Fools, Including the Author, Who Went in Search of Them; and Man Down!: Proof Beyond a Reasonable Doubt That Women Are Better Cops, Drivers, Gamblers, Spies, World Leaders, Beer Tasters, Hedge Fun Managers, and Just About Everything Else.

After discovering dozens of run-on subtitles, I naturally began to wonder what was at work here.  My initial theory was that this sudden gush of wordiness is a natural by-product of book publishing’s desperate times.  In a marketplace glutted with too many titles – and in a culture that makes books more marginal by the day – publishers seem to think that if they just shout loudly enough, people will notice their products, then buy them.  In other words, the run-on subtitle is literature’s equivalent of flop sweat, that stinky slime that coats the skin of every comedian, actor and novelist who has ever gotten ready to step in front of a live audience knowing, in the pit of his stomach, that he’s going to bomb.  But when I asked around, my flop sweat theory started to hold less and less water.

John Valentine co-founded The Regulator Bookshop in Durham, N.C., more than thirty years ago.  Since then he has helped build it into a beloved cultural institution in the so-called “Triangle” of Raleigh, Durham and Chapel Hill, where there just might be more writers per-capita than in any other place on the planet outside select zip codes in Brooklyn and Manhattan’s Upper West Side.

“I’d say about three years ago I started noticing more words on covers, more buzzwords,” Valentine told me when I dropped by the shop recently.  When I ran my flop sweat theory past him, he shook his head.  “I think it’s driven by Search – with a capital S – whether it’s Google or Amazon or whatever.  A lot of our customers hear about books on NPR, and when they come in the store they can’t always remember the author or the title.  The more words a customer might remember, the more keywords we can use to Google it.  If a word is rather unique, we’re more likely to find it.  With the river of books – with the river of everything – most people want to have more unique words associated with their product.”

covercoverMost people, maybe, but not all people.  Valentine has noticed another trend running counter to the run-on subtitle.  “The converse of it,” he says, “is publishers and authors who feel confident.  They tend to go small.”  He waved at several examples on a shelf near the front of the store – Cleopatra: A Life by Pulitzer-Prize winner Stacy Schiff; Just Kids by Patti Smith, which won a National Book Award; Frank: The Voice by James Kaplan; Townie: A Memoir by Andre Dubus III; and Life by Keith Richards.  It doesn’t get much more concise than that.  Maybe It by Stephen King.

And there are exceptions to Valentine’s theory.  Simon Winchester, who scored a major hit in 2005 with The Professor and the Madman: A Tale of Murder, Insanity and the Making of the Oxford English Dictionary, has just published Atlantic: Great Sea Battles, Heroic Discoveries, Titanic Storms, and a Vast Ocean of a Million Stories.  Maybe Winchester simply believes in sticking with a winning formula.  Tina Rosenberg, who has won a National Book Award and a Pulitzer Prize, is out with Join the Club: How Peer Pressure Can Transform the World.

covercoverWhile not overly wordy, Rosenberg’s subtitle falls into what I call the “Tao of How” category – books that promise to show us how the world really works, and how we can use that knowledge to transform our humdrum lives into epic experiences full of bliss, friends, great sex, wisdom and/or bags of money.  Recent efforts include Connected: How Your Friends’ Friends’ Friends Affect Everything You Feel, Think and Do by Nicholas A. Christakis and James H. Fowler; and Jane McGonigal’s Reality Is Broken: Why Games Make Us Better and How They Can Change the World.

While working as an editor at Houghton Mifflin (now Houghton Mifflin Harcourt), Eamon Dolan bought the concept that eventually became The Big Roads.  Dolan, who has since become vice president and editor-in-chief at The Penguin Press, contends that verbose subtitles have always been with us and probably always will be.  He also believes that subtitles have become an especially valuable marketing tool in our digital age, echoing John Valentine’s theory.

“I’d say that subtitles are important enough to the success of a nonfiction book that hardly any such book is published without one,” Dolan said in an e-mail.  “Traditionally (and still), the subtitle explicitly states the book’s subject and purpose and implicitly tries to signal who its audience is.  In the 21st century, the subtitle has a more pointed intent as well – to offer keywords that might come up in web searches.  While we do not design subtitles with this particular goal in mind, it is a use that suggests subtitles are as essential now as ever they were.”

coverDolan doesn’t believe you can judge the effectiveness of a subtitle merely by looking at its length.  Some pithy ones are perfect, he contends, while a long freight train can be just as effective.  To prove his point, Dolan cites the very different subtitles on two books he edited.  “A favorite subtitle of mine right now is the one for Moonwalking With Einstein by Joshua Foer – The Art and Science of Remembering Everything. Its lyricism, clarity and faux-grandiosity beautifully and efficiently convey the book’s ambitious scope and endearing tone.  Often the author, editor, publisher, et al, brainstorm and/or wrangle at length over titles and subtitles, but these came directly from the author even before the manuscript was complete.  And we knew right away that we couldn’t improve on them.  Brevity is often a goal in this realm because shorter subtitles enter the mind more readily and are easier to incorporate into a jacket design.”

coverThat said, he added, “Another of my favorite subtitles is an exception that proves the rule.  Word Freak by Stefan Fatsis was subtitled Heartbreak, Triumph, Genius and Obsession in the World of Competitive Scrabble Players.  It’s double-wide, to be sure, but it earns every inch of the real estate it takes up.  I love how its two halves rub against each other in a way that sparks a reader’s interest.  How could such lofty qualities as heartbreak, genius, etc., arise in such a nerdy arena as a Scrabble contest?  To me, and to many, many other readers, this has proven an irresistible question.”

covercoverThat sweaty wrestling match Dolan describes – the author, editor, publisher, et al, locked in a room wrangling over potential titles and subtitles – is familiar to most authors of non-fiction books, and to more than a few writers of fiction.  But when Malcolm Jones, a culture writer at Newsweek/The Daily Beast, was getting ready to publish a memoir, the wrestling match was fairly painless.  “On my book, we – I think this discussion finally involved my editor, agent and wife – we tried a subtitle but it just sounded like a second title,” Jones said by e-mail.  “So we figured we’d label it ‘a memoir’ and let people work it out.  This, of course, resulted in the stampede of sales.”  The book’s cover is elegant in its simplicity, just the words Little Boy Blues: A Memoir and a photograph of the author at the age of 10 or so, reading a newspaper and pretending to smoke an unlit pipe, the picture of future literary sophistication.  It echoes the beautiful economy of the cover of Experience: A Memoir by Martin Amis, which shows the author as a tow-headed pre-teen with a scowl on his face and a cigarette clenched between his lips.  That scowl and that cigarette leave no doubt that this is one bad, bad lad.

Why is such gorgeous restraint the exception in contemporary publishing?  “I’m tempted to go with your flop sweat theory,” Jones says.  “Having made the initial error to publish way more than they should, publishers cravenly attempt at the last minute to adorn their hundreds of titles with some sham distinction in the baseless hope that, yes, this will attract a reader or two.  Or maybe some of it has to do with playing to the computer’s power to aggregate.  I wish this were more far-fetched than it sounds.”

Which brings us, finally, to Earl Swift, my friend who wrote The Big Roads.  He describes the creation of the book’s title and subtitle not as a wrestling match but as a “collaborative process” between himself, his editors and the publishing house’s marketing people.  In the end, they agreed on a title that they felt was less opaque and more self-explanatory than the dozens of possibilities they’d bounced back and forth.

“Some publishers go for short titles so that you can stack the words vertically on the cover,” says Swift, the author of three previous non-fiction books.  “That allows you to go with bigger type and give the book more visual impact.  But some short titles are so obscure or general that they require amplification.”

When it came time to compose a subtitle that would help readers understand what The Big Roads was about, Swift said his main goal was to debunk a common misconception.  “I thought we had to telegraph to potential readers that they don’t know the story as well as they think they do.  You say ‘interstate highways’ and most people immediately think ‘Eisenhower.’  So I thought we had to signal that the people responsible for those highways are people you’ve probably never heard of.”

And so it came to pass that author and publisher agreed on a subtitle that might have once sounded breathless to me but, on second thought, actually does accomplish what it set out to do.  It alerts readers to the fact that our interstate highways did not pop fully formed out of Dwight Eisenhower’s vacuous skull.  For that reason, among many others, I hope the book sells faster than Krispy Kremes.

(Image: Untitled from joost-ijmuiden’s photostream)

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16 Responses to “Are Run-On Subtitles Literature’s New Flop Sweat?”

  1. David Newton
    at 8:53 am on April 11, 2011

    Bill Morris continues to offer timely insight into today’s literay scene backed up by solid reporting and his personal experience.
    We want more.

  2. Courtney Thomas Vance
    at 3:40 pm on April 11, 2011

    I don’t know about long subtitles, but long titles in general kind of make my day. I certainly *hope* that this is a developing trend. I think the pressure to condense titles into short, little thematic bursts is limiting.

    Consider the original title of Robinson Crusue – “The Life and Strange Surprizing Adventures of Robinson Crusoe, of York, Mariner: Who lived Eight and Twenty Years, all alone in an un‐inhabited Island on the Coast of America, near the Mouth of the Great River of Oroonoque; Having been cast on Shore by Shipwreck, wherein all the Men perished but himself. With An Account how he was at last as strangely deliver’d by Pyrates.”

    Amazing and frankly, way better than the painfully dull “Robinson Crusoe”.

    A more contemporary novel with a long ass name: “No Matter How Much You Promise to Cook or Pay the Rent You Blew It Cauze Bill Bailey Ain’t Never Coming Home Again”.

  3. DAS
    at 4:31 pm on April 11, 2011

    My favorite book is …


    Personally, I would have dropped the period.

  4. Jim Raper
    at 8:11 am on April 12, 2011

    Brillat-Savarin’s remarkable Physiologie du goût (The Physiology of Taste) was published in December 1825, two months before his death. The full title is Physiologie du Goût, ou Méditations de Gastronomie Transcendante; ouvrage théorique, historique et à l’ordre du jour, dédié aux Gastronomes parisiens, par un Professeur, membre de plusieurs sociétés littéraires et savantes.

  5. Tammela
    at 9:10 am on April 12, 2011

    To piggy-back off of Courtney Vance, I enjoyed this essay but kept wishing Morris would mention how wordy titles have been around ever since the novel appeared. Many early British novels from the 18th century are subtitled in a similar explanatory to today’s books, though we know most of them by their short titles:

    -Samuel Richardson’s “Pamela, or Virtue Rewarded” and “Clarissa, or the History of a Young Lady”
    -Henry Fielding’s “The History of Tom Jones, a Foundling” (not a subtitle per se, but most know it as simply “Tom Jones”) and “The History of the Adventures of Joseph Andrews and his Friend, Mr. Abraham Abrams” (which we know as “Joseph Andrews”)
    -Daniel Defoe’s “Roxana: The Fortunate Mistress” (along with “Robinson Crusoe…”, as Courtney Vance pointed out above)

    And even into the 19th century with Dickens’ “David Copperfield or The Personal History, Adventures, Experience and Observation of David Copperfield the Younger of Blunderstone Rookery (which he never meant to publish on any account)”

  6. James
    at 1:48 pm on April 12, 2011

    Note that in that era, fiction carried ponderous subtitles, while most non-fiction didn’t.

  7. Michael O.
    at 2:23 pm on April 12, 2011

    The debate over run-on subtitles reminds me of a common issue in appellate law. When filing an appeal, the best lawyers pick one or two key errors made by the lower court and then argue that those errors warrant a reversal. Bad lawyers–or litigants without lawyers–are rarely so discriminating. They try a bit of everything, and often present scattershot arguments about ten or even fifteen errors made by the lower court. These appeals are usually less successful, and the briefs are a chore to read.

    A run-on subtitle is a little like a bad appellate brief. It broadcasts “I’ll try anything” rather than “I know what I’m about.” If a subtitle is necessary, it should be short, like Philip Short’s “Mao: A Life” or Robert Stone’s “Prime Green: Remembering the Sixties.” My favorite book titles have no subtitle, like James Baldwin’s “The Fire Next Time,” Tony Judt’s “The Memory Chalet,” and Brian McGinty’s “John Brown’s Trial.” It’s true that those titles leave something to the imagination. But when it comes to buying books, I for one would rather be enticed than bludgeoned.

  8. Shannon
    at 2:34 pm on April 12, 2011

    My father and I have joked for a while now about writing a book called, “Subtitle: The Inability of Modern Writers of Non-Fiction to Limit the Length of Their Titles.”

  9. Leslie
    at 4:58 pm on April 12, 2011

    After you read the sub-title you don’t have to read the book.

  10. woid
    at 12:35 am on April 13, 2011

    The “How…” (and sometimes “Why…”) subtitles are especially rampant among political books, both from the left and right. A few examples, chosen from Amazon’s better-sellers…

    — The Shadow Party: How George Soros, Hillary Clinton, and Sixties Radicals Seized Control of the Democratic Party by David Horowitz and Richard Poe

    — The Trillion-Dollar Conspiracy: How the New World Order, Man-Made Diseases, and Zombie Banks Are Destroying America by Jim Marrs

    — American Taliban: How War, Sex, Sin, and Power Bind Jihadists and the Radical Right by Markos Moulitsas Zúniga

    — Netroots Rising: How a Citizen Army of Bloggers and Online Activists Is Changing American Politics by Lowell Feld, Nate Wilcox and Markos Moulitsas Zúniga [again]

    …And my favorite, a book that will tell us both Why AND How:

    — Why ObamaCare is Wrong for America: How the New Health Care Law Drives Up Costs, Puts Government in Charge of Your Decisions, and Threatens Your Constitutional Rights by Grace-Marie Turner, James C. Capretta, Thomas P. Miller and Robert E. Moffit

    Subtitles as clumsy as these are a helpful consumer guide — they’re as good as a sticker reading “Warning: Dreadful prose within.”

  11. garrett kelly
    at 11:28 am on April 13, 2011

    Excellent work Sir Billiam Morris

  12. Friday funnies | Quillblog | Quill & Quire
    at 4:45 pm on April 15, 2011

    […] trend of run-on subtitles « Previous post // noConflict override var $j = jQuery.noConflict(); // When the […]

  13. Monday Tally: Science Proves What We Knew About Books Already
    at 6:26 pm on April 25, 2011

    […] hard not to click on an article titled “Are Run-On Subtitles Literature’s New Flop Sweat?” isn’t it? In the piece for The Millions, Bill Morris writes about the tendency in nonfiction to […]

  14. Callista
    at 6:22 pm on April 26, 2011

    I don’t mind long subtitles except when I’m trying to fit it in the post title when I review a book. It gives you more information about what’s in the book besides the title (which often tells you nothing) but not as much as the summary which you sometimes don’t have time to read.

  15. Richard Jenkins
    at 7:37 am on August 30, 2011

    This post really brings the phrase… “don’t judge a book by it’s cover” to a new perspective. Good post.

  16. Your Book in a Sentence: An Ode to the Subtitle
    at 10:45 am on June 24, 2013

    […] everyone is as gung-ho about subtitles as I am. Back in 2011, The Millions asked whether run-on subtitles were literature’s new flop sweat, responding specifically to one of my favorite subtitles of all time, Moby Duck: The True Story of […]

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