Essays

James Ross and The Agony of the One-Hit Wonder

By posted at 6:01 am on October 14, 2010 13

1.
James Ross published just one novel in his lifetime.  This is a rare thing because of a paradox that lies at the heart of novel writing: it demands such sustained focus, such persistence, so much raw pig-headed stubbornness that anyone who does it once almost invariably does it again, and again, and again.  Once is almost never enough.  The agony is just too delicious.  Yet after his debut novel, They Don’t Dance Much, appeared in 1940, James Ross published a dozen short stories but no more novels.  When he died in 1990 at the age of 79, he could have been a poster boy for that rarest and most tortured breed of novelist: the one-hit wonder.

Truth to tell, They Don’t Dance Much was not a very big hit.  When Ross met Flannery O’Connor at the Yaddo artists’ retreat in Saratoga Springs, N.Y., in the late 1940s, O’Connor wrote to her agent: “James Ross, a writer who is here, is looking for an agent.  He wrote a very fine book called They Don’t Dance Much.  It didn’t sell much.”

Yet Ross has always had a fiercely devoted, if small, band of acolytes.  I count myself among them.  So did Raymond Chandler, who called Ross’s novel “a sleazy, corrupt but completely believable story.”  Another fan is Newsweek critic Malcolm Jones, who last year picked They Don’t Dance Much as one of his 10 favorite crime novels.  In his New York Times review of a 1994 novel called Mucho Mojo by Joe R. Lansdale, the gifted novelist Daniel Woodrell listed some of Lansdale’s “country-noir” predecessors, including James M. Cain, Erskine Caldwell and Jim Thompson.  “James Ross is scarcely ever mentioned,” Woodrell wrote, “though his one novel, They Don’t Dance Much (1940), might be the finest of the lot.  He is the forebear Mr. Lansdale most strongly brings to mind.  They share a total trust in the straightforward power of a man’s voice speaking when he has a witch’s brew of a tale to tell.  No tricks, no stylish ennui, no somnambulant remoteness or pointless savagery are required…”

True on every count.  There is abundant savagery in Ross’s novel, including a graphic description of a man getting tortured, beaten to death, dumped into a vat off bootleg beer, then burned.  But the savagery has a point – it is almost always a by-product of greed – which is a very different thing from saying it points toward some sort of moral, or even some species of authorial judgment.  Ross was too cold-eyed, too much of a realist to care about such niceties.  As he put it himself: “Some reviewer said the novel was ‘Southern Gothic,’ suggesting a piece of fiction dealing in fantastic occurrences in an overdrawn setting.  My…aim was merely to show it the way it was and leave it to the reader to reach his own conclusions as to the point of it, if there was any, or draw his own moral if he needed one.”

The “straightforward power of a man’s voice” in this case belongs to the novel’s narrator, Jack McDonald, a down-on-his-luck North Carolina farmer who is about to lose his exhausted 45 acres for non-payment of back taxes.  Jack jumps at the chance to go to work as cashier for a roughneck named Smut Milligan, who’s about to expand his filling station into the biggest, noisiest, nastiest roadhouse for miles around, a bona fide knife-and-gun club that attracts a barely literate, frequently drunk, occasionally violent and largely worthless clientele.  With this crew – and a ringleader like Smut Milligan – it’s inevitable that there will be blood.

The straightforward power of Jack’s voice is established in the book’s opening sentences: “I remember the evening I was sitting in front of Rich Anderson’s filling station and Charles Fisher drove up and stopped at the high-test tank.  The new Cadillac he was driving was so smooth I hadn’t heard him coming.  He sat there a minute, but he didn’t blow the horn.”

Ross needs fewer than 50 words to tell us many valuable things: that his narrator is the shiftless type who hangs around filling stations; that Charles Fisher is so rich he can afford the very best, including a purring new Cadillac that drinks high-test gas; and that Fisher isn’t the sort of rich man who lords it over the hired help.

Ross continues: “Fisher’s wife was with him.  She had looked at me when they first drove up, but when she saw who it was she turned her head and looked off toward the Methodist Church steeple.  She sat there looking toward the steeple and her face cut off my view of her husband.  But that was all right with me; I had seen him before.  I had seen Lola too, but I looked at her anyway.”

In addition to being straightforward, this writing has the great virtue of compression, which means its seeming simplicity is both a mask for and the source of its deep complexity.  Writing this way might look easy, but it’s not.  Writers as diverse as Hemingway, Joan Didion and Elmore Leonard are proof, as are their legions of tin-eared imitators.

coverAnother of the novel’s many pleasures is the way Ross uses money to do something all successful novelists must do – bring his story to life in a particular place at a particular time.  In this he’s reminiscent of Balzac, who managed to mention money at least once on every page he ever wrote.  To cite just a few examples from Cousin Bette: “It cost me two thousand francs a year, simply to cultivate her talents as a singer” … “At the age of fifty-two years, love costs at least thirty thousand francs a year” … “Tell me, are you worth the six hundred thousand francs that this hotel and its furnishing cost?”

Money is every bit as important, though not nearly as plentiful, in Ross’s fictional North Carolina mill town called Corinth, a stand-in for the hamlet of Norwood where he grew up.  The time is the late 1930s, when the Depression is ending and the Second World War is beginning.  In that place at that time, Ross tells us, a bottle of beer cost 10 cents, a steak sandwich cost 40 cents and a pint of “Breath of Spring” corn liquor cost a dollar.  A cotton mill worker earned $40 a month while the more skilled hosiery mill worker earned that much in a week, though the work frequently drove him blind by the age of 30.  All this is a shorthand way of establishing the thing that is not supposed to exist in America but always has and always will: a class system.  Another tool Ross uses to expose it is his characters’ speech.

Here’s a bit of social analysis from one of the roadhouse regulars: “Oh, Yankees is got the money…  They’s a few folks in Corinth got money too.  Henry Fisher is got plenty of money.  But folks like that go to the beach and to Californy, and to Charlotte, and up Nawth to spend it.  They ain’t comin out here for no amusement.”  And here’s Charles Fisher pontificating to a visitor from the North about the South’s troublesome white trash: “The main problem down here is the improvidence of the native stocks, coupled with an ingrained superstition and a fear of progress.  They are, in the main, fearful of new things…  I think they merely dislike the pain that is attendant to all learning.”

Jack, who lost his farm and can’t afford to pay for his mother’s burial, has a low opinion of the higher-ups: “They were the people that are supposed to be nice folks, but like a dram now and then.  And when nobody is looking like to kiss somebody else’s wife and pinch her on the behind and let their hands drop on her thigh, always accidentally, of course.”  That accidentally, of course establishes Ross’s kinship with all true storytellers since Homer, his understanding that all classes – that is, the whole human race – is essentially unimprovable, an eternal mix of meanness and nobility, violence and compassion, horror and humor.

Which brings us to Ross’s greatest gift of all, his sly wit.  Here’s Jack describing the woods around the roadhouse: “It was still down there toward the river.  You could hear the mosquitoes singing, ‘Cousin, Cousin,’ just before they bit you.  When they got their beaks full of blood they’d fly off singing, ‘No kin, No kin,’ just like humans.”

And here’s Jack asking Smut about a gift he gave the sheriff:

“What was that you gave him in the paper sack?” I asked.

“A quart of my own private Scotch.  Confound his time, he ought to appreciate that.  I paid four bucks a quart for that stuff.”

“I didn’t know the sheriff drank,” I said.

“He don’t drink much.  Just takes a little for medicine when he has a cold.”

“You think he’s got a cold now?” I asked.

“I understand he keeps a little cold all the time,” Smut said.

coverEven such wonderfully wry writing couldn’t keep the book from slipping into obscurity.  Then in 1975, 35 years after its original publication, the novel was re-issued in hard-cover by Southern Illinois University Press as part of the Lost American Fiction series edited by Matthew J. Bruccoli.  Ross was about to retire after 20 years as a political reporter and editorial writer at the Greensboro Daily News, which followed stints as a semi-pro baseball player, farmer and IRS clerk.  A few years after his retirement, I took a newspaper job in Greensboro and happened to rent an apartment a few blocks from where Jim and his wife, Marnie Polk Ross, lived.  I was still in my twenties, still more than a dozen years from publishing my own first novel, and so naturally I was in awe of a writer who’d hob-nobbed with Flannery O’Connor and written a novel that had just been anointed a classic.  Beyond that, Jim Ross became a friend to me and many other young writers in town because he never offered false praise and yet he had a way of making us believe in ourselves.  He showed us that a writer can come out of the red-clay gulches of rural North Carolina during the Depression – that is, a writer can come out of absolutely anywhere at any time – and make high art without resorting to tricks, stylish ennui or pointless savagery.  It was the sort of encouragement and inspiration only the luckiest aspiring writers get.  Coming from Jim Ross, it meant the world.

2.
While visiting Greensboro recently, I pulled up to the house where Jim spent his last years.  To my surprise, Marnie was out in the front yard in lemony sunshine, raking leaves.  Though I was uninvited and unannounced and hadn’t seen her since Jim’s funeral 20 years ago, she invited me in, gave me a glass of ice water, and started telling me stories, which is something Southerners of a certain age still tend to do.

Right off, she stunned me.  She told me a college professor named Anthony Hatcher had visited her a while back, expressing an interest in writing some sort of scholarly article about Jim.  She’d given Hatcher all of Jim’s papers, including the 318-page manuscript of a novel called In the Red.  I remembered Jim mentioning something about a second novel when I first met him, back in the 1970s.  When I’d asked him if he planned to try to publish it, he’d said, “It’s no damn good.”  Then his voice had trailed off.  I assumed it was unfinished, or unpolished, and that he had never showed the novel to anyone.  Marnie set me straight.

“Jim tried very hard to get it published,” she said.  “He sent it to (the agent) Knox Burger, but nobody wanted to publish it.  I think that rejection had a lot to do with Jim’s declining health.  I think Jim was kind of a pessimist and he didn’t really expect it to sell.  He hoped it would sell – writers are always hoping their work will sell.  They want it more than anything, but it doesn’t always happen.”

Knox Burger, I learned later, was the fiction editor at Collier’s when the magazine published two of Jim’s short stories in 1949, “Zone of the Interior” and “How To Swap Horses.”  (Jim also published short stories in the Partisan Review, Cosmopolitan, the Sewanee Review and Argosy.)  Burger went on to become a book editor and then, beginning in 1970, a celebrated literary agent.  If he couldn’t sell your novel, your novel was in serious trouble.

So Jim Ross, it turns out, was something even more tortured than a conventional one-hit wonder.  He was an unwilling one-hit wonder, a writer who went back to the well and wrote a second novel and then gave up because nobody bought it and he convinced himself it was no damn good.  There can’t possibly be anything delicious about that kind of agony.

Rosemary Yardley, a former newspaper colleague of mine and a good friend of the Ross’s, remembers visiting Jim in Health Haven Nursing Home, where he was frequently admitted in his later years due to debilitating osteoarthritis.  Jim called the place “Hell’s Haven.”

“I asked him about that novel,” Rosemary told me, “and he said, ‘I tried to sell it but they don’t like the way I write anymore.  I don’t write what they look for today.’  He was probably right.  He wrote old-fashioned stories in the sense that they always had a good plot.”

Finally I reached Anthony Hatcher, who lives in Durham, N.C., and teaches journalism and media history at nearby Elon University, which Jim Ross attended for one year.  “I re-read They Don’t Dance Much last year,” Hatcher said, “and when I learned that he left the college under mysterious circumstances, I became extremely interested.  I decided I would dive into the life of Jim Ross.  I tracked down Marnie, some of Jim’s former newspaper colleagues, his sister Jean Ross Justice (a short story writer and widow of the poet Donald Justice) and his sister Eleanor Ross Taylor (a poet and widow of the fiction writer Peter Taylor).  I’m still collecting archival material.  In addition to the In the Red manuscript, which is based on political figures in Raleigh, there’s a 113-page fragment of a novel called Sunshine In the Soul.  My initial thinking is that I would write about Jim Ross the fiction writer – his published novel and short stories – and then tackle the unpublished work.  I would love to do an in-depth treatment of Jim Ross and his place in the Greensboro literary scene, going back to the days of John Crowe Ransom and Allen Tate in the 1930s.”  Hatcher plans to take an eight-month sabbatical next year to work on the book.

3.
So Jim Ross was an unwilling one-hit wonder who might yet have another day in the sunshine.  This unlikely twist of fate got me thinking about other writers who stopped publishing after they sold their first novels, for reasons that range from rejection to writer’s block to drink, drugs, depression, shyness, madness, a loss of interest or a loss of nerve, or the simple realization that they said all they had to say in their one and only book.  The most famous are Harper Lee (To Kill a Mockingbird), Margaret Mitchell (Gone With the Wind) and Ralph Ellison (Invisible Man).  Less well known was Anna Sewell, who was not a professional writer but scored a major hit with Black Beauty in 1877.  A few months after the book was published she died of hepatitis.  That is just plain wrong.  (Ellison and Henry Roth, who published his second novel 60 years after his debut, Call It Sleep, have recently joined Vladimir Nabokov and Roberto Bolaño in publishing novels after they died, which can’t be an easy thing to do.)

coverAnd then there is the group I think of as Mislabeled One-Hit Wonders – writers who actually published more than one novel but will forever be identified with the one that made their names.  J.D. Salinger (The Catcher in the Rye), Malcolm Lowry (Under the Volcano), Frederick Exley (A Fan’s Notes), Joseph Heller (Catch-22), Richard Yates (Revolutionary Road) and Jack Kerouac (On the Road) come immediately to mind.  Those books dwarfed everything else their creators wrote, which is a both a tribute to those books and an unfair slap at their sometimes very fine but terminally overshadowed brethren.

covercoverAnd finally there’s the curious case of Dow Mossman, who published a novel called The Stones of Summer in 1972, then evaporated.  Thirty years later, a fan named Mark Moskowitz made a documentary film called Stone Reader, about his love for the novel and his quest to find its mysterious author, who, it turned out, was hiding in plain sight in Cedar Rapids, Iowa, in the house he grew up in.  Barnes & Noble CEO Stephen Riggio was so taken by the movie that he invested $200,000 in its distribution and paid Mossman $100,000 for the right to re-issue the novel in hard-cover.  The reclusive Mossman suddenly found himself on one of the most improbable book tours in the history of American publishing.

Moskowitz’s motivation for making the documentary was simple: “I can’t believe a guy could write a book this good and just disappear and never do anything again.”

Well, believe it.  It doesn’t happen often, but it does happen.  It sort of happened to Jim Ross and Ralph Ellison.  Many people wrongly think it happened to J.D. Salinger.  It definitely happened to Harper Lee.  And it almost never ends as it ended for Dow Mossman, whose book tour took him to Boston, where one day in the fall of 2003 he found himself puffing a cigar while gazing out at the Charles River and talking to a newspaper reporter.  “I don’t think I’ve caught up with the reality of it yet,” Mossman said.  “It’s pretty unreal.”

What happened to Mossman is way beyond unreal.  It’s just about impossible.





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13 Responses to “James Ross and The Agony of the One-Hit Wonder”

  1. Joe
    at 11:46 am on October 14, 2010

    Very cool article. I often think of these types of writers, and what the rest of their lives were like. Do you they have a stack of undiscovered manuscripts, or have they gone on to focus on other things?

  2. Biblioklept
    at 12:05 pm on October 14, 2010

    Cool post. There is, of course, the theory that Harper Lee never followed up To Kill a Mockingbird because she never wrote it in the first place. Not that I necessarily believe that Truman Capote wrote To Kill a Mockingbird. I mean, it totally stands to reason that two childhood friends from a tiny town in Alabama should both produce American literary classics, right?
    There’s also di Lampedusa’s The Leopard.

  3. Nit
    at 12:15 pm on October 14, 2010

    I am probably the only person who thinks SOMETHING HAPPENED is far superior to CATCH-22. To me, that is Heller’s masterpiece.

  4. Shelley
    at 1:03 pm on October 14, 2010

    Of course Harper Lee wrote it. Her screenplay writer, Horton Foote, changed my life and my work, so I am always happy to point out that sometimes lightning strikes only once.

    That’s a lot more than it strikes 99% of the rest of us.

  5. Don
    at 1:05 pm on October 14, 2010

    Check out the book Bartleby & Co. by Enrique Vila Matas, a novel consisting of footnotes to a book that has not been written, largely about people who never wrote, or who wrote and stopped forever, or who wrote and stopped for a long time. Very enjoyable read.

  6. BookieMonster
    at 3:58 pm on October 14, 2010

    There’s also A Confederacy of Dunces by John Kennedy Toole – surely one of the ultimate one hit wonders? (Though through very sad circumstances.)

  7. NME
    at 4:58 pm on October 14, 2010

    Breece D’J Pancake’s posthumous THE COLLECTED STORIES OF BREECE D’J PANCAKE must be mentioned, as well.

    Two other excellent one-hit wonders: FAT CITY by Leonard Gardner, and THE BOOK OF EBENEZER LePAGE by Gerald Basil Edwards.

  8. Daily book biz round-up: Bad Sex Award; one-hit wonders; and more | Quillblog | Quill & Quire
    at 10:36 am on October 15, 2010

    […] The Millions looks at one-hit wonders […]

  9. NME
    at 11:30 am on October 16, 2010

    Also, Stephanie Vaughn’s SWEET TALK. Great writer. Anyone know what happened to her? She seems to have slipped off the face of the earth…

  10. North Carolina Miscellany » Blog Archive » Sunday link dump: No comics or Parade, but still….
    at 7:44 am on October 17, 2010

    […] – Harper Lee, Margaret Mitchell, Ralph Ellison…  Jim Ross. […]

  11. malcolm jones
    at 7:21 pm on October 18, 2010

    You can never say too many kind words about the writing of Jim Ross, but Bill Morris says them as well as anyone could.

  12. carol
    at 11:27 am on October 20, 2010

    great essay – most entertaining AND informative. I want to read They Don’t Dance Much – and more of Bill Morris’s work.

  13. David
    at 2:55 pm on October 20, 2010

    Of course, Mr. Morris, some of us have been waiting these past twelve years for YOUR third novel.

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