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  • Out this week: The Immortal Evening by Stanley Plumly; Last Winter We Parted by Fuminori Nakamura; Bathing the Lion by Jonathan Carroll; Sometimes the Wolf by Urban Waite; Splitting an Order by the former Poet Laureate Ted Kooser; Limonov by Emmanuel Carrère; and The Heart Is Strange by John Berryman, which I wrote about as part of our Great Second-half 2014 Book Preview. Support The Millions: Bookmark this link and start there when you shop at Amazon.


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    ~Thomas Beckwith
  • Heading to London in the near future? Stop by the British Library’s new Terror and Wonder, which bills itself as the UK’s biggest Gothic exhibition in history. To whet your appetite, you can read this Guardian piece by Neil Gaiman, in which the Sandman author names Mary Shelley’s Frankenstein the apex of Gothic fiction. Related: our own Hannah Gersen on Frankenstein and the “Year Without a Summer.”


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    ~Thomas Beckwith
  • Recommended Reading: Our own Elizabeth Minkel on Sherlock and fan fiction. You can also read another essay of hers on fan fiction here at The Millions.


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    ~Thomas Beckwith
  • Back in April, Dreamworks announced its plans to adapt Eleanor and Park by Rainbow Rowell for the silver screen, with the author writing the script. A few months later, Rowell published a new book, Landline, that marked a return to adult fiction. At The Rumpus, Amanda Green sits down with the author to talk about YA, her productivity and the importance (or not) of getting up early to write. FYI, our own Janet Potter reviewed Eleanor and Park and Fangirl.


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    ~Thomas Beckwith
  • In 1817, the painter Robert Benjamin Haydon invited several guests over for what he called an “immortal dinner.” Why the bombastic name? The guests included Keats and Wordsworth, whom Haydon wished to introduce to each other. In the WaPo, Michael Dirda takes a look at The Immortal Evening, a new book about the event by Stanley Plumly.


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    ~Thomas Beckwith
  • “What’s the point of reading literature?” Electric Literature shares a video that offers a compelling 4-point answer.


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    ~Kaulie Lewis
  • It’s no secret we enjoy and highly recommend The Atlantic‘s By Heart series, and Vikram Chandra‘s essay on reading Hemingway is no exception. Pair with Jonathan Goldman‘s review of a modern edition of The Sun Also Rises.


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    ~Kaulie Lewis
  • Recommended reading: Catherine Lacey writes for Granta about “The Question of Fate” and fiction writing.


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    ~Kaulie Lewis
  • Modern technology has finally developed a device that aims to aid all perpetually distracted writers – the cleverly titled Hemingwrite.


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    ~Kaulie Lewis
  • Laila Lalami recently wrote about “How History Becomes Story,” but writing an interesting and compelling history book sans fiction has its own challenges. Thankfully S.C. Gwynne offers some tips in a piece for the History News Network, including the hard-hitting reminder that “it is your job to force your facts into narrative form.”


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    ~Kaulie Lewis
  • “There is something terrifying but also fascinating about contemplating the end of humanity,” and on Oct. 25th our own Edan Lepucki and Emily St. John Mandel (whose novel Station Eleven was just shortlisted for the National Book Award) will be discussing their recent apocalyptic fictions at the Texas Book Festival.


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    ~Kaulie Lewis
  • “There are a lot of bad movies about writers out there,” but Flavorwire has ranked the 50 best, ranging from Sylvia to The Hours to Adaptation.


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    ~Kaulie Lewis